I have managed to make OpenShot more stable under Linux.

In a previous blog posting, I had reported that OpenShot was dangerously unstable, and even unstable under its native Linux. I’m basing this on OpenShot 1.4.3, installed from the package manager under Debian / Jessie, with a KDE 4.14 desktop.

This Was The Posting.

It turns out that there can be ways to overcome this instability.

Firstly, I have changed the Output Mode, with which this application renders its previews, from “sdl” to “sdl_preview“.

More importantly there seems to be a detail in its practical use, which I was unaware of before. Earlier, I had imported a captured .OGG / .OGV file into its video clip resources. In itself this presents a problem, in that certain .OGV Theora files, especially ones produced by screen capture, are known to give this program problems. This can be anticipated, by the video clips in question having blank thumbnails.

On the first try, I told OpenShot to play the video clip anyway in its preview window. The progress bar went from the beginning to the end at the correct speed, but once it reached the end, the application became unresponsive and KDE had to shut it down forcibly. This was with the Output Mode still set to “sdl“.

Apparently, once OpenShot has crashed, it has saved corrupted information into the folder ‘~/.openshot‘ . Had I known this, I could have deleted that folder completely before trying out the application again. But instead I tried to use OpenShot again right away, sometimes telling it to play the .MP4 version of the same video or other clips.

That was when my desktop froze. The X-server did not crash, but no movement or mouse input could be given anywhere on the desktop. The actual mouse pointer was still moving in response to the mouse however, and it was also changing from the usual pointer, to the special pointer when hovering over the preview panel. I needed to use <Ctrl>+<Alt>+F1 in order to open a Virtual Terminal in text mode, and then to ‘kill -9‘ the actual application pinning the other virtual terminal.

My setups typically allow for multiple sessions to be logged in at once, and Virtual Terminals 1-6 are text-based, while the graphical ones start from Virtual Terminal 7. So once the offending processes were killed, I was able to <Ctrl>+<Alt>+F7 back into the graphical session, which was not corrupted.

But the way I finally broke this spell with OpenShot, was to delete the directory ‘~/.openshot‘ and its corrupted contents. After that, the application was able to play the .MP4 video clips fine, which also had thumbnails that corresponded to their content.

Also, if I decide that a user-space configuration is needed to ensure the stability of the system, I copy the contents of the configuration folder for one application, into ‘/etc/skel‘, from where a skeleton of starting files is copied, every time the home directory of a new user is set up. That way, any newly-installed user will inherit my recommended settings.

In order to do that, after I deleted the config folder once, I only launch the application briefly, and make my configuration settings, before exiting the application again immediately. At that point I feel that the config folder is in its correct state, to be copied to ‘/etc/skel‘ .

There are certain purposes, which OpenShot may be better able to suit than alternatives, simply because OpenShot has more features.

Dirk

 

An Alternative to OpenShot under Linux

In the past, I used to be a fan of the non-linear video editor named “OpenShot”. It is the kind of editor which allows for multiple source clips to be added to multiple, parallel timelines, and for transitions and effects to be added, to put those together into a longer video presentation. One could say that OpenShot was a software-end to the process of compositing. In the past, I had even custom-compiled version 1.1 of OpenShot on the Linux computer I name ‘Walnut’, and gotten that into a state in which it could be used. This means that I did not write the source code in any way, but that I did overlook a lengthy process, by which this source code could be translated into an executable program, on a platform which would not ordinarily have supported it. However, v1.1 still lacked many of the features which later versions claim to have, and that eventually become necessary. V1.1 did not have the Blue-Screen or Green-Screen, Chroma-Key effect.

These days, OpenShot v1.4.3 is directly available through the (Linux) package manager under Debian / Jessie. But I don’t use it, mainly because I cannot. I seem to have discovered that there are major stability issues with recent versions of this video editor. On my Linux box named ‘Phoenix’, this video editor actually caused my desktop to freeze – not once but three times. Almost all my other, package-installed software, is comparatively well-behaved, and I have no other reason to think, that my graphics chipset is in any way faulty.

Under Linux, even a defective application run in user space, should not be able to get the desktop to freeze.

There is also a Windows version, v2.0.6, which I next tried to install on the Windows 7 computer named ‘Mithral’. I did not like the fact to begin with, that this is the type of install which asks the user to reboot Windows for the changes to take effect. But then I also found that the Windows version would constantly crash. Next, having OpenShot v2.0.6 installed under Windows, actually prevented a ‘GPG4Win’ application named “Kleopatra” from working on ‘Mithral’. This last detail worries me.

Yet, after I uninstalled OpenShot from the Windows computer and rebooted again, Kleopatra was working again.

And so the bottom line for me is, that this once-great video editor is now too unstable to be used.

On the Debian / Jessie, Linux computer named ‘Phoenix’, I can use “Kdenlive” instead, which does more or less what OpenShot was supposed to do, and which does these things without crashing. Kdenlive also offers the user to place video clips he supplies into multiple timelines, and to apply transitions and effects, and does include the “Blue Screen” (alpha / translucency) effect.

But under Windows, I can still only see paid-for solutions to this need.

Dirk