How 3D-plotted, implicit functions are often inferior, to ISO-Surfaces rendered for 3D Gaming.

One of the subjects which I revisited in recent weeks has been, that either Computer Algebra Systems, or other numeric toolboxes, may plot functions. And a fact that should be pointed out is, that to plot a function, either as a 2D or a 3D plot, is always numeric, even if it’s being offered as part of what a ‘CAS’ can do (a “Computer Algebra System”). And so, a subcategory of what is sometimes offered, is a 3D plot, of an implicit function, kind of like this one:

hyperboloid

This is a plot, of complementary hyperboloids, which are the 3D counterparts to 2D hyperbola.

What some people might just wonder is, how the refined toolbox works, that plots this type of implicit function. And one way in which this can be done, is by generating an ISO-Surface, which is a derived mesh, along which a Density that has been computed from X, Y and Z parameters, crosses a threshold-value, which can just be named (H) for the sake of this posting.

And, in turn, such an ISO-Surface can be computed, by using the ‘Marching cubes algorithm‘. If it gets used, this algorithm forms a geometry shader, which accepts one Point as input topology, and which outputs a number of triangles from (0) to (4).

The question which this posting poses is, whether the mesh which is output by such an algorithm, will always include vertex-normals. And the short answer is No. Applications exist, in which normals are computed, and applications exist where normals are not computed. And so, because some users are used to high-end gaming, and used to seeing shaded surfaces, which can only really be shaded if normals have been made available to a fragment shader, those users might find themselves asking, why Mathematical plotting algorithms might exist, which never compute real normals.

(Updated 5/07/2020, 16h15… )

Continue reading How 3D-plotted, implicit functions are often inferior, to ISO-Surfaces rendered for 3D Gaming.

Noticing when SageMath is using IPython, instead of Maxima.

One of the subjects of my recent postings, has been a Computer Algebra System called “SageMath”, which I was able to install on my Debian / Stretch (Debian 9) computer named ‘Plato’. One of the distinctions which I left slightly blurred about this, is the distinction between Computer Algebra, and Numerical Tools. The former refers to the ability of a computer to manipulate symbols, in the way Algebra manipulates them, but to solve equations which Humans might just find tedious or too time-consuming to solve. This can lead to answers that are theoretically exact, but which can sometimes be useless because the numerical equivalent is only available indirectly.

Numerical Tools are more numerous under Linux, and offer theoretically inexact solutions to equations, simply because the numerical answers have a limited number of decimal places after the point or comma. Yet, the numerical answers can sometimes be much more useful than Algebraic answers, for reasons that I think are self-explanatory.

SageMath offers both. In order to do Algebra, SageMath uses “Maxima” as its back-end. And under Debian Linux, installing SageMath actually installs a separate version of Maxima, which users are not supposed to use directly.

Continue reading Noticing when SageMath is using IPython, instead of Maxima.