Memcached no longer contributes, to how this site works… For the moment.

One of the facts which I had mentioned some time ago, was that on my Web-server I have a daemon running, which acts as a caching mechanism to any client-programs, that have the API to connect to it, and that daemon is called ‘memcached‘.

And, in order for this daemon to speed up the retrieval of blog-entries specifically, that reside in this blog, and that by default, need to be retrieved from a MySQL database, I had also installed a WordPress.org plugin named “MemcacheD Is Your Friend”. This WordPress plugin added a PHP script, to the PHP scrips that generally generate my HTML, but this plugin accelerated doing so in certain cases, by avoiding the MySQL database look-up.

In general, ‘memcached‘ is a process which I can install at will, because my server is my own computer, and which stores Key-Value pairs. Certain keys belong to WordPress look-ups by name, so that the most recent values, resulting from those keys, were being cached on my server (not on your browser), which in turn could make the retrieval of the most-commonly-asked-for postings – faster, for readers and their browsers.

Well, just this morning, my WordFence security suite reported the sad news to me, that this WordPress plugin has been “Abandoned” by its developer, who for some time was doing no maintenance or updates to it, and the use of which is now advised against.

If the plugin has in fact been abandoned in this way, it becomes a mistake for me to keep using it for two reasons:

  1. Updates to the core files of WordPress could create compatibility issues, which only the upkeep of the plugin by its developer could remedy.
  2. Eventually, security flaws can exist in its use, which hackers find, but which the original developer fails to patch.

And so I have now disabled this plugin, from my WordPress blog. My doing so could affect how quickly readers can retrieve certain postings, but should leave the retrieval time uniform for all postings, since WordPress can function fine without any caching, thank you.

memcached_1

Dirk

 

WordPress Update Went Smoothly Today.

I run a localized version of , that partially comes from my Linux package manager, but that has been modified by me, to allow me to install the plug-ins and extensions from .

Therefore, whenever an update to the core files is available from Debian Team – from the package manager – I am a little apprehensive, that the way this update is carried out might not be compatible with my customizations.

Most of the time, updates are good, but on occasion, they may break things.

Today an update to the core package came through the package manager, which technically puts my version at ‘‘. I am sure that there are benefits to users like me. But most importantly, it seems that this update did not break anything. Yay!

Also, I am not recording any down-time, because as far as I can tell, I was able to display a Maintenance Mode page, while the update took place, which would have told readers that the site is undergoing maintenance, for a few minutes.

Dirk

P.S. I also had to restart my ‘‘ daemon after that, the purpose of which is to introduce caching on my side – on the server – to speed up retrieval of whatever readers are interested in most often. Because this cache has therefore been flushed, some of the pages and postings may load a little slowly for the next day or two.

(Edit 02/03/2017 : ) I have begun to notice some functional changes in the behavior of WordPress, that I believe stem from this update. In short, the new version seems to use my caching daemon more consistently, than the previous build did.

Continue reading WordPress Update Went Smoothly Today.