“Hardware Acceleration” is a bit of a Misnomer.

The term gets mentioned quite frequently, that certain applications offer to give the user services, with “Hardware Acceleration”. This terminology can in fact be misleading – in a way that has no consequences – because computations that are hardware-accelerated, are still being executed according to software that has either been compiled or assembled into micro-instructions. Only, those micro-instructions are not to be executed on the main CPU of the machine.

Instead, those micro-instructions are to be executed either on the GPU, or on some other coprocessor, which provide the accelerating hardware.

Often, the compiling of code meant to run on a GPU – even though the same, in theory as regular software – has its own special considerations. For example, this code often consists of only a few micro-instructions, over which great care must be taken to make sure that they run correctly on as many GPUs as possible. I.e., when we are coding a shader, is often a main paradigm. And the possibility crops up often in practice, that even though the code is technically correct, it does not run correctly on a given GPU.

I do not really know how it is with SIMD coprocessors.

But this knowledge would be useful to have, in order to understand this posting of mine.

Of course, there exists a major contradiction to what I just wrote, in OpenCL and CUDA.

Continue reading “Hardware Acceleration” is a bit of a Misnomer.