Memcached no longer contributes, to how this site works… For the moment.

One of the facts which I had mentioned some time ago, was that on my Web-server I have a daemon running, which acts as a caching mechanism to any client-programs, that have the API to connect to it, and that daemon is called ‘memcached‘.

And, in order for this daemon to speed up the retrieval of blog-entries specifically, that reside in this blog, and that by default, need to be retrieved from a MySQL database, I had also installed a WordPress.org plugin named “MemcacheD Is Your Friend”. This WordPress plugin added a PHP script, to the PHP scrips that generally generate my HTML, but this plugin accelerated doing so in certain cases, by avoiding the MySQL database look-up.

In general, ‘memcached‘ is a process which I can install at will, because my server is my own computer, and which stores Key-Value pairs. Certain keys belong to WordPress look-ups by name, so that the most recent values, resulting from those keys, were being cached on my server (not on your browser), which in turn could make the retrieval of the most-commonly-asked-for postings – faster, for readers and their browsers.

Well, just this morning, my WordFence security suite reported the sad news to me, that this WordPress plugin has been “Abandoned” by its developer, who for some time was doing no maintenance or updates to it, and the use of which is now advised against.

If the plugin has in fact been abandoned in this way, it becomes a mistake for me to keep using it for two reasons:

  1. Updates to the core files of WordPress could create compatibility issues, which only the upkeep of the plugin by its developer could remedy.
  2. Eventually, security flaws can exist in its use, which hackers find, but which the original developer fails to patch.

And so I have now disabled this plugin, from my WordPress blog. My doing so could affect how quickly readers can retrieve certain postings, but should leave the retrieval time uniform for all postings, since WordPress can function fine without any caching, thank you.

memcached_1

Dirk

 

Major Upgrade This Evening, Downtime

Both the Linux-laptop I name ‘Klystron’, and the server of this Web-site, this server being named ‘Phoenix’, received a major update this evening. On ‘Phoenix’, a total of 78 packages needed to be updated, including a Kernel-Update, and a Graphics-Driver Update. This collective update effectively converted both computers from Debian 8.7 to Debian 8.8 systems. And both updates appear to have succeeded, at first glance without breaking anything.

However, this was an update that required a reboot for ‘Phoenix’, even though this is my Web-server, and so my site was also down briefly, from approximately 20h40 until 20h50.

I am happy to say however, that ‘Phoenix’ had been running for 58 days straight, without requiring any reboot whatsoever until tonight.

Oh, but I must disappoint some of my readers with the fact that performing these updates also required I restart my ‘memcached‘ service, which means that pages or postings the readers like to visit most often will be a bit slower to fetch, until this server-side caching is replenished.

Dirk

 

Recent Update to libevent

Sometimes updates come through the package manager, which I do not blog about immediately. One such update took place in recent days, to the package ‘libevent-2.0-5‘.

After the update, I assumed that most of the programs which depended on this library were user-space applications. So I logged out my session and logged back in, without affecting system services such as the Web-server or ‘memcached‘. This maintenance-action of mine went by uneventfully – no pun intended. And doing so also restarted my X-server.

But then I decided to inquire, which services exactly depended on this library. And it turns out that ‘memcached‘ was the single process which remained, that did, and which therefore also deserved a restart. So I restarted this daemon tonight, thus flushing the cache. Therefore, response to readers of this blog might seem a little slow in the next few days.

Aside from that, I have a quiet feeling that by updating this library, the Debian Team may have fixed my spring.

Dirk