An Observation about the Discrete Fourier Transforms

Discrete Fourier Transforms, including the Cosine Transforms, tend to have as many elements in the frequency-domain, as the sampling interval had in the time-domain.

Thus, if a sampling interval had 1024 samples, there will be as many frequency-coefficients, numbered from 0 to 1023 inclusively. One way in which these transforms differ from the FFT, is in the possibility of having a number of elements either way, that are not a power of 2. It is possible to have a discrete transform with 11 time-domain samples, that translate into as many frequency-coefficients, numbered from 0 to 10 inclusively.

If it was truly the project to compute an FFT that has one coefficient per octave, then we would include the Nyquist Frequency, which is usually not done. And in that case, we would also ask ourselves, whether the component at F=0 is best computed as the summation over the longest interval, where it would usually be computed, or whether it makes more sense then, just to fold the shortest interval, which consists of 2 samples, one more time, to arrive at 1 sample, the value of which corresponds to F=0 .

Now, if our discrete transform had the frequency-coefficients

 


G(n) = {1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1}


 

Then the fact could be exploited that these transforms tend to act as their own inverse. Therefore I can know, that the same set of samples in the time-domain, would constitute a DC signal, which would therefore have the frequency-coefficients

 


F(n) = {1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0}


 

If this was taken to be a convolution again, because the discrete transforms are their own inverse, it would correspond to the function

 


F(n) ยท S(m) == S(m)


 

We would assume that multiplication begins with element (0) and not with element (10). So I have a hint, that maybe I am on the right track. But, because the DCT has an inverse which is not exactly the same, the inverse being the IDCT, the next question I would need to investigate, is whether indeed I should be using the DCT and not the IDCT, to turn an intended set of frequency-coefficients, into a working convolution. And to answer that question, the simple thought does not suffice.

The main advantage with the DCT would be, that we will never need to deal with complex values.

Dirk

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