I’ve just custom-compiled ‘Aqsis’.

To give some context to this proclamation, I had written an earlier posting, about adapting the non-packaged software named ‘Ayam‘ to Debian / Stretch, that had worked just fine under Debian / Jessie. This is a GUI which constructs complex ‘Renderman‘-Compliant rendering instructions, in this case in the form of .RIB-Files, which in turn, ‘Aqsis’ can turn into 2D perspective views of 3D scenes, that have been software-rendered. OTOH, Ayam itself uses OpenGL and H/W rendering, for its GUI.

What I had found before, was that Ayam did not seem stable anymore under Debian / Stretch. I apologize for this assessment. Under close scrutiny, my computer has revealed, that it was really Aqsis giving the problems, not Ayam. Aqsis is a text-based tool in effect.

Ayam does not specifically need to be used with Aqsis to do its rendering. It can be set up to use other rendering-engines, most of which are quite expensive. Aqsis just happens to be the best Open-Source rendering-engine, whose language Ayam speaks. And at this point I’d say that Ayam is still quite stable, after all, under Debian / Stretch.

As is often the case with such troubles, I next sought to custom-compile Aqsis, to see whether doing so could get rid of its quirks. What were its quirks?

Finally, the only problem with Aqsis was and remains, that it cannot produce a real-time preview of the scene being edited, which it used to provide using a component-program named ‘piqsl’. And the reason why the packaged version of Aqsis does not have ‘piqsl’ under Debian / Stretch, is because this distribution of Linux has a very new ‘Boost’ library ( v1.62 ) , and the visual component to Aqsis, that could produce a display, still relies on the Qt4 libraries and their API, which have begun to bit-rot. The Qt4-specific code of Aqsis cannot parse the newest usage of the Boost libraries, and Debian maintainers have long since discovered this. They are shunning the use of ‘libqt4-dev’ and of ‘libqt4-opengl-dev’ to build any of their packages. So they were effectively forced to package a version of Aqsis, which was missing some important components.

(Updated 12/12/2017 … )

Continue reading I’ve just custom-compiled ‘Aqsis’.

This Time, some Real Computer Achievement

Contrarily to how easy it was to set up my Joystick the other day, yesterday and today I have been busy with the laptop I name ‘Klystron’ that actually required some computer-skills on my part.

It was a subject of mine for a long time, how 3D Game Design works, and in particular, how the raster-based DirectX or OpenGL rendering works. To study that subject in my private time, I have always maintained a set of programs, that would in theory enable me to create a game.

In practice, creating any game decent enough to play, requires oodles of time and work. But I always felt that the software-tools involved should belong to my collection, even if I do not really put them to thorough use.

One software tools I have been pursuing, is the graphics rendering engine called “OGRE“. For several years I have been trying to custom-compile OGRE 1.10, just because that version offers better support for OpenGL 3, which should give game authors access to Geometry Shaders. But as it happens, I have ‘Mesa‘ drivers installed on that laptop, that do claim to create support for OpenGL 3, but that oddly, do not go so far as to offer Geometry Shaders. This is not a fault of the OGRE development team.

Also, there are reasons for which I do not simply ditch the Mesa drivers for ‘fglrx‘, the latter of which would give me OpenGL 4: I find it important enough, that the Mesa drivers allow hardware-acceleration of regular, high-def, 2D video streams. I would not want a real video stream / movie to become a burden to my CPU, and the fglrx do not GPU-accelerate that. So I stick with the Mesa drivers.

But then there was only one good way to get my OGRE install stable. I had to switch the Mercurial version of it I was subscribing to, down to OGRE 1.9, which is highly stable. The only issue with that remains, that OGRE 1.10 would have been my only game engine, which would have ever offered me full OpenGL 3. Which was just not stable on that box.

Now that the OGRE version on ‘Klystron’ is a sensible 1.9, that also means the engine has no extreme advantage over other game engines I possess. They all tend to be of the vanilla variety, that offer OpenGL 2 / DirectX 9c… – GL 3 would be equivalent to Dx 10, and GL equivalent to Dx 11.

Speaking of vanilla, I also installed the latest snapshot of Crystal Space on ‘Klystron': Version 2.1 ! I am amazed at how much better this latest build of Crystal Space seems, in terms of being stable when compiled, than earlier builds of it were.

Continue reading This Time, some Real Computer Achievement