Testing the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 external sound device, with my Samsung S6 Smart-Phone

I have tested, whether this external USB recording tool, works with my Samsung Galaxy S6 Smart-Phone, using an ‘‘ OTG adapter. The results were mixed. In An Earlier Posting, I had tested whether this external USB Sound Card, works under Linux. And the answer to that question was a resounding Yes.

Scarlett 2i2 _1

When we plug an OTG adapter into a smart-phone or tablet, this puts the mobile device into Master / Host Mode, that would otherwise normally work in Slave Mode. Thus, we can then plug in a USB storage device, and hopefully have that recognized, while by default, we can only plug our mobile device into a computer, and have the computer recognize this mobile device, as the storage device.

But it is also plausible to connect other external devices to our mobile device, when using an OTG adapter. All this happens because the OTG adapter itself contains an additional chip, that gives it the ability to act as a USB Host. Whether such external devices will work or not, generally depends on two factors:

  1. Whether the micro-USB port on the mobile device can output enough current, to supply the external / Slave device, and
  2. Whether the mobile device possesses the drivers needed, for the USB device in question. Under Linux, this last question is more likely to be answered in the affirmative.

The OTG adapter I was using, uses its micro-USB side as the only power-supply. This means that if the connected device draws a full 500mA of supply current, we are pushing the limit, that is generally set for USB 2.0  PC ports.

Continue reading Testing the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 external sound device, with my Samsung S6 Smart-Phone

Android App Permissions Dialog

Most Android users are at least vaguely aware, that every time we install or update an app, we’re shown a dialog with a list of permissions the app is requesting on our mobile device. We can either Allow or Deny this request.

What people should be aware of as well, is that by default, Android did not allow us to Accept or Decline each permission on its own. We were shown the whole list, and would then have to either Accept or Decline the entire list, and in the latter case, the app would not install, or the update would not take place.

This was a rather powerless feature, because when we declined an update, Google Play would just come back within short order, and offer the same update again. Also, there was no way to opt out of updating for one specific app. So we would then either be obliged to accept the update at a later time, or to uninstall the app.

This was the status-quo up to and including “Android Lollipop”. The Android version that came after Lollipop, and which is the current version, is called “Marshmallow”. And the main, key improvement which Marshmallow offers, is control by the user, for each individual permission the app is asking for. With Marshmallow, the user is no longer obliged either to accept the entire list of permissions or to reject it. He can grant or deny any specific permission, and then still install the update, which gets rid of the messages for that update.

One reason fw this is important, is the possibility of a “Privilege Escalation”, which is also a known form of cyber-attack. Privilege Escalation means, that an already-installed app can ask for progressively more permissions during each update, which users often don’t pay strict attention to, so that after several updates, the app has a dangerous collection of them on our device.

Granted, most of the time the apps need a large number of permissions for innocuous purposes, or maybe because they’re just not programmed well enough, to work without those. But the potential exists for too liberal a set of permissions eventually to compromise our privacy online, or even our online security.

This is why, regardless of whether we have Marshmallow or not, we should in fact be examining the requested permissions each time, before we simply grant them.

Having said that, I don’t have Android Marshmallow yet. This is secondhand information, from a friend of mine who is in the know, and who has Marshmallow on at least one of his devices.

Dirk