How to know, whether our Qt 5 C++ projects make use of dynamically-loaded plug-ins.

I have used Qt Creator, with Qt version 5.7.1, to create some simplistic GUI applications as exercises. And then, I used the tool named ‘linuxdeployqt’, in order to bundle those (compiled) applications into AppImage’s, which should, in principle, run on other users’ Linux computers. (:4)  But, when using these tools, a question arose in my head, which I was also able to deduce the answer to quickly, in the form of, ‘Why does linuxdeployqt exist separately from linuxdeploy? Why does the developer need a tool which bundles library files, but which exists separately, just for C++ Qt applications? Obviously, some AppImages are not even based on that GUI library.’

And the short answer to that question is, ‘Because unlike some other application frameworks, Qt is based heavily on plug-ins, which none of my simpler exercises required explicitly.’ And, what’s so special about plug-ins? Aside from the fact that they extend the features of the application framework, plug-ins have as special property, that the application can decide to load them at run-time, and not with static awareness, at build-time. What this means is that a tool such as ‘linuxdeploy’ will scan the executable, which has been built by whichever compiler and/or IDE the developer used, will find that this executable is linked to certain shared libraries (with static awareness), but will not recognize some of the libraries which that executable needs to run, just because those are plug-ins, which the application will only decide to load at run-time.

Hence, to get the full benefit of using ‘linuxdeployqt’, the developer ‘wants to’ end up in a situation similar to the situation described Here. Granted, the person in question had run in to a bug, but his usage of the feature was correct.

This usage differs from my earlier usage, in that I never fed any ‘extra-plugins’ list to ‘linuxdeployqt’, yet, when I used the tool for creating the AppImage, my (project’s) plug-ins folder was populated with certain libraries, that were also plug-ins. And so, a legitimate question which an aspiring developer could ask would be, ‘How do I know, whether my Qt application loads plug-ins dynamically at run-time, so that I’ll know, whether I also need to specify those when bundling my AppImage?’ After all, it would seem that in certain cases, the plug-ins are in fact loaded with static awareness, which means that ‘linuxdeployqt’ can just recognize that the application is loading them, without the developer having had to make any special declaration of the fact.

One possible answer to that question might be ‘Test the AppImage, and see if it runs.’ But one problem with that answer would be, that if the executable cannot find certain plug-ins as bundled with the AppImage, the danger exists, that it may find those on the Host Machine, and that the application will end up running on some hosts, but not on other hosts, depending on what version of Qt the recipient has installed, and, depending on which plug-ins that recipient also has installed. And so, a better way must exist, for the developer to know the answer to this question.

(Updated 4/05/2021, 8h55… )

Continue reading How to know, whether our Qt 5 C++ projects make use of dynamically-loaded plug-ins.

Managing Usershares properly, under SAMBA (meaning, under the SMB emulation given by Linux).

Just to encapsulate the subject of this posting… ‘SMB’ is a file-sharing protocol which is really Windows-owned. Granted, ‘SMB1‘ cannot be fully Windows-owned, but, on the assumption that a ‘SAMBA’ server is being used to emulate ‘SMB2′ and ‘SMB3′ (under Linux), there are many ways in which the (root-owned) configuration file at ‘/etc/samba/smb.conf’ could be faulty, and could result in weird error messages. The fixes which are highlighted in this posting worked for me, but my reader could be suffering from mistakes of an entirely different nature. I am posting this, in case the reader happens to be suffering from the same configuration mistakes which I was.

Also, my configuration issues arose partially, because I’ve switched this configuration file from a configuration in which Home Directories are being shared out in their entirety, to a configuration in which individual users can decide to share out specific folders they own. This system is one of ‘Usershares’.

What I was eventually doing was, to give the command ‘net usershare add <Share-Name> "<Path-Name>" "<Comment>" Host\\user1:f,Host\\user2:f‘. The comma and the absence of spaces in the Access Control List are important. I was getting the error-message stating, that these user-names, part of the ACL, could not be converted into SIDs. What I found was, that I had the following error in my ‘smb.conf’ file:

 


   map to guest = bad user
   guest account = nobody

(...)

   server max protocol = SMB3
   server min protocol = SMB2


 

Amazingly, the error message went away, if I changed that last detail to:

 


   client max protocol = SMB3
   server min protocol = SMB2

 

But, there is more to be known about my configuration:

 


usershare allow guests = no
usershare max shares = 10
usershare owner only = false
usershare path = /var/lib/samba/usershares

 

What this last set of parameters actually requests is, that individual users should not be able to grant Guest Access – unauthenticated access – to any of their folders, but potentially, to grant access which is authenticated by another SAMBA username, with their enabled password, as existing on the server.

Again to my amazement, I found that, if the server is massaged adequately, it will implement the settings exactly as requested. But it will do so with a crucial limitation. Locally on the server, the non-owner username must already have access to the exact folder named in the usershare. What level of access that username has (to the named folder itself), will cap whatever level of control is granted by way of a SAMBA client.

This observation could also be rephrased as follows: Even though (Linux) SAMBA has an impressive-looking feature in “Usershares”, while that creates rule-files in the folder ‘/var/lib/samba/usershares’, which even possess Access-Control Lists, those ACLs finally disappoint, in NOT guaranteeing what the behaviour of the SAMBA server will be, once a usershare has finally granted access (to a folder, for the client). (:2)

Usually, in order to grant such access locally on the server, some strategy with group memberships and permission-bits gets used. Which exact arrangement of groups and permission-bits gets used, is not set in stone. Any arrangement will work that grants full access. But, because it’s usually unwieldy for users to set up such local sharing of their folders, they are also not likely to succeed – without compromising their security completely – unless they also have the help of someone with root access. Therefore, the ability to give this feature to users in user-space, is theoretical at best. (:1)  And, if the user wants to activate this extension, he or she must use the CLI, and cannot count on the GUI within ‘Dolphin’ to do so. But, the final command given via the CLI can be given as user.

By default,  declaring a usershare ‘the easy way, via the GUI’, remains owner-only.


 

There is one more caveat to mention. According to my recent experiences, if ‘Dolphin’ is being used as the SAMBA client, and if it’s to authenticate with the server, using any username other than the current username on the local client-computer, then the credentials need to be specified under ‘System settings -> Network -> Connectivity’ (where the Plasma 5.8 Desktop manager puts them). If there is a set of credentials there, they will not be stored encrypted, but only stored with casual obfuscation, and Dolphin will use them. If the user wants the credentials to be stored in the ‘kwallet’ (and thus encrypted), he needs to make his username, to log into the server with, identical to his username on the local client. Otherwise, illogical error messages will appear again, this time, from the Dolphin file-browser not being consistent, in whether to try to authenticate at all. And, if an attempt is made to access the share without authenticating, then Dolphin generates an illogical error message, which can be paraphrased as a ‘File Exists’ error message.

With enough effort, and, sacrificing some security, it can all be done.

(Updated 3/29/2021, 15h10… )

Continue reading Managing Usershares properly, under SAMBA (meaning, under the SMB emulation given by Linux).

Installing Chrome on Old Debian Versions (Redirect from Installing Old Chrome Version on Debian).

In recent weeks I’ve been noticing some rather odd behaviour, of the Linux version, of the most up-to-date Chrome browser. In short, every time I launched the browser on my Debian 9 / Stretch computer, that has the Plasma 5.8 Desktop Manager, certain malfunctions would set in, specific to the desktop manager. I waited for several Chrome version upgrades, but the malfunctions persisted. And, as far as I can tell, the problem boils down to the following:

Google will only distribute the latest Chrome version, and when they tag the line which one is supposed to have in one’s Sources.list with ‘stable’, apparently, they mean both the Stable version of Chrome, And, for the Stable version of Debian. According to Google, Debian 10 happens to exist right now, because that is the “stable” version (of Debian), but, Debian 9 and Debian 8 don’t exist anymore. Except for the fact that many people could still have either installed.

Continue reading Installing Chrome on Old Debian Versions (Redirect from Installing Old Chrome Version on Debian).

How to route a USB MIDI Keyboard to a JACK-MIDI Input, under Debian.

One of the possessions which I have is a USB MIDI Keyboard, which I’d like to be able to play, so that my computer’s software synthesizers actually generate the sound…

dsc_0001 email

I know that this can be done because I’ve done it before. But in the past, when I set this up, I was either using an ‘ALSA’ MIDI input, belonging to an ‘ALSA’ or ‘PulseAudio’ application such as “Linux Multimedia Studio”, or I was using ‘QSynth’, which is a graphical front-end to ‘fluidsynth’, but in such a way that QSynth was listening for ALSA MIDI, and outputting JACK audio. This is actually a very common occurrence. I can switch between using the ‘PulseAudio’ and using the ‘JACK’ sound daemon, through a carefully set-up configuration of ‘QJackCtl’, which suspends PulseAudio when I activate JACK, and which also resumes PulseAudio, when I shut down JACK again.

But there is a basic obstacle, as soon as I want to play my MIDI Keyboard through ‘Ardour’. Ardour v6 can be run with the PulseAudio sound system, but only for playback, or, Ardour can be run with its JACK sound back-end, after JACK has been launched. Ardour cannot be run with its ALSA back-end, when PulseAudio is running.

The default behaviour of the Debian kernel modules, when I plug in a USB MIDI Keyboard, is, to make that MIDI connection visible within my system as an ALSA MIDI source, even though some applications, such as Ardour, will insist on only taking input from JACK MIDI sources, when in fact running in JACK mode. And so, this problem needed to be solved this morning…

Screenshot_20201206_091955

The solution which I found was, to feed the Keyboard, which happens to be an “Oxygen 61″, to the ‘MIDI Through Port’ that’s visible in the ALSA Tab of QJackCtl’s Connections window. When MIDI sequences are fed there, they are also output from the System JACK MIDI sources, visible in the MIDI Tab of QJackCtl’s Connections window:

Screenshot_20201206_092022

Screenshot_20201206_092039

I should also note that, in many cases, the JACK clients can ask the JACK sound daemon to be connected to various inputs and outputs from within, without absolutely requiring that the QJackCtl Connections window be used. This explains why the audio output of Ardour was already routed properly to my PC’s speakers. But I found that I could only keep track of the MIDI connection, through QJackCtl’s Connections window. As the screen-shots above show, the second step is, to feed one of the System Sources to the appropriate Ardour MIDI input, in the MIDI Tab of QjackCtl’s Connections window.

The result was, that the synthesizer which I have available as an Ardour plug-in, played beautifully, in response to my pressing keys on the actual MIDI Keyboard, and no longer just, when I clicked on the graphical keyboard within the Ardour application window:

Screenshot_20201206_092206

This on-screen keyboard can be made visible, by double-Alt-Clicking on the icon of the instrument, with Ardour in its Mixer view, and then expanding the resulting windows’ MIDI Keyboard fly-out. Yet, the on-screen keyboard was only useful for setup and testing purposes.

Tada!

 

(Updated 12/07/2020, 17h20… )

Continue reading How to route a USB MIDI Keyboard to a JACK-MIDI Input, under Debian.