The failings of low-end consumer software, to typeset Math as (HTML) MathML.

One of the features which HTML5 has, and which many Web-browsers support, is the ability to typeset Mathematical formulae, which is known as ‘MathML’. Actually, MathML is an extension of XML, which also happens to be supported when inserted into HTML.

The “WiKiPedia” uses some such solution, partially because they need their formulae to look as sharp as possible at any resolution, but also, because they’d only have so much capacity, to store many, many image-files. In fact, the WiKiPedia uses a number of lossless techniques, to store sharp images as well as formulae. ( :1 )

But from a personal perspective, I’d appreciate a GUI, which allows me to export MathML. It’s fine to learn the syntax and code the HTML by hand, but in my life, the number of syntax-variations I’d need to invest to learn, would be almost as great, as the total number of software-packages I have installed, since each software-package, potentially uses yet-another syntax.

What I find however, is that if our software is open-source, very little of it will actually export to MathML. It would be very nice if we could get our Linux-based LaTeX engines, to export to this format, in a way that specifically preserves Math well. But what I find is, even though I posses a powerful GUI to help me manage various LaTeX renderings, that GUI being named “Kile”, that GUI relies back on a simple command-line tool named ‘latex2html’. Whatever that command-line outputs, that’s what all of Kile will output, if we tell it to render LaTeX specifically to HTML. ‘latex2html’ in turn, depends on ‘netpbm’, which counts as very old, legacy software.

One reason ‘latex2html’ will fail us, is the fact that in general, its intent is to render LaTeX, but not Math in any specific way. And so, just to posses the .TEX Files, will not guarantee a Linux user, that his resulting HTML will be stellar. ‘latex2html’ will generally output PNG Images, and will embed those images in the HTML File, on the premise that aside from the rasterization, PNG Format is lossless. Further, if the LaTeX code was generated by “wxMaxima”, using its ‘pdfLaTeX’ export format, we end up with incorrectly-aligned syntax, just because that dialect of LaTeX has been optimized by wxMaxima, for use in generating .PDF Files next.

(Updated 05/27/2018 : )

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Getting the Orca Screen-Reader to work under Plasma 5

In case some readers might not know, even though computing is heavily visual, certain advanced desktop-managers can be set up for impaired people to use – which also falls under the category of “Accessibility”. This includes the ability of the computer to speak a robotic description of what’s happening on the screen, in case a user can hear, but not see properly.

There are some users who feel they should stick with Windows, because Accessibility can be so hard to set up under Linux.

There are other users who are sorry they every clicked on “Accessibility”, because now they cannot turn it off.

If a visually-impaired user wants Accessibility set up on a Linux computer, I’d definitely suggest letting a trusted other person set it up, because until it’s set up, complicated things may need to be done, and accessibility will not be set up, so that the end-user will not benefit from Accessibility, while trying to set it up.

Some regular users find screen-readers trying for their patience, because of the fast, robotic voice, until they manage to shut it down again. Personally, I only find screen-readers trying, If I happen to have set one up late at night, because the voice could cause some sort of noise-complaint from my neighbors, droning on until I manage to disable it again. In the middle of the day, I don’t find these experiments trying.

I guess that a good question which some people might ask me, would be why I even do such an experiment, given that I’m not visually impaired and don’t need it. And what I do is set everything up until it works, and then disable it again.

On my recently-installed Debian / Stretch computer named ‘Plato’, which is also running Plasma 5 as its desktop-manager, I just did manage to get this feature to work, and then to disable it again.

(Updated 15h50, 1/17/2018 : )

The first thing I had to do, was install a long list of packages. The list below includes what was installed, but it should not really be necessary to give the command to the package-manager manually, to install everything here, because some of these packages will follow as dependencies from other packages. But here is a roundabout list:

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