Exploring the newer GUI front-end, for use with SageMath.

One of the subjects which I had written about only yesterday, is that the Computer Algebra / Numerical Tool System called ‘SageMath‘ was available in the repositories, for Debian / Stretch – which is in itself news – and that additionally, the default way to use it under Debian is through a Web-interface called ‘SageNB’. Well what I’ve now learned is that the SageMath developers no longer support SageNB, and are continuing their work with the graphical front-end called ‘Jupyter‘.

But, installing Jupyter under Debian is a bit of a chore, because unlike how it is with custom-compiles, Debian package maintainers tend to break major software down into little bits and pieces. At one point, I had Jupyter running, but with no awareness of the existence of SageMath. What finally did the trick for me today, was to install the following packages:

  • python-notebook
  • jupyter-nbextension-jupyter-js-widgets
  • sage-math-jupyter

Needless to say, that last package out of the three is the most important, and may even pull in enough of the other packages, to be selected by itself. It’s just that I did not know immediately, to install that last package.

So this is what SageMath 7.4 looks like, through Jupyter:

screenshot_20180916_165217

(Corrected 09/18/2018, 3h50 … )

(Updated 09/18/2018, 5h40 … )

(As of 09/16/2018, 20h10 : )

Frankly, I was a bit disappointed at first. My main disappointment seemed to be with the fact, that this GUI did not offer to typeset the Math. It does allow us to ‘download’ our Notebooks as PDF-Files, but when we do, we simply get the same, highlighted text, and graphics, only as a PDF – in code – or with whatever appearance the browser-view is already showing us. Also, the support for 3D plots is lackluster, as the plot above is non-interactive. At least with SageNB, I was able to select the ‘canvas3d’ viewer, which allowed the plot to be rotated. Also, if we use SageMath from the command-line, it defaults to using ‘JMol’ as its viewer, which is full-featured.

But as it turns out, I have discovered ‘the trick’, to getting Jupyter to typeset the users’ Math…

Continue reading Exploring the newer GUI front-end, for use with SageMath.

I now have LyX working properly, on my Linux tablet.

According to This Earlier Posting, I had installed “GNURoot (Debian)” and “XSDL” on an old tablet, that are both Android apps available from Google Play, and which do not use ‘root’. There were numerous Linux-applications which would run, and many more that do not. I had also installed numerous Linux-packages that can collectively be referred to as “LaTeX” on that tablet, which actually just means by itself, command-line programs. Yet, even when typesetting using ‘LaTeX’, it’s often more fun to use a GUI. And the Linux-application “LyX” is such a GUI.

So, I have the hypothetical ability to do serious document-work on that tablet, even though the tablet is only using an emulated mouse, and “Hacker’s Keyboard”, and the mentioned emulated X-server.

What I recently did, was to get LyX to work properly:

screenshot_2018-05-27-09-28-22

Continue reading I now have LyX working properly, on my Linux tablet.

tex4ht / mk4ht Broken (Problem Solved).

As of 05/26/2018 :

I have just been experimenting with a GUI front-end to LaTeX, that is called ‘LyX’, and it tries to be a WYSIWYG LaTeX Editor.

LyX tries to give editing capabilities for LaTeX documents, using an editor style similar to most word processors. Mind you, this task cannot always succeed 100%, because by its nature, LaTeX will encode the logical structure of a document-to-be-typeset, while conventional word processors try to control the appearance of documents.

And so one feature that LyX does have, is to import and export documents of various formats, most of which revolve around different LaTeX coding-styles, or around ‘rendering’ our LaTeX document to such formats as PDF or DVI, just because those two output-formats have arbitrarily emerged as standard publishing formats. DVI is really only interesting as a legacy Linux graphics format.

And so what some people will want to do, is convert documents from LaTeX either to OpenDocument format, or even to MS Word Format. These formats are initially visible in the Export Menu, if the user has command-line tools such as ‘mk4ht’ installed.

What can frustrate some people who are new to Linux, is that the command-line itself may be defective in some way, meaning that it malfunctions, and in my own experience, trying to get ‘mk4ht’ to work can be futile, when it does not work out-of-the-box. And then, trying to fiddle with the GUI of LyX is also to no avail, because the GUI can finally only work as well as the command-line, back-end that it has detected.

So instead of trying to repair ‘mk4ht’ – which, if it was working, could just as easily be tested from the command-line:


mk4ht oolatex somefile.tex

 

(Edited 05/27/2018 : )

I would propose that any readers of this blog, who have run into such a problem, and who are running Debian / Stretch, try instead, to install a Debian package called “pandoc”, as well as “pandoc-citeproc”. When LyX recognizes these programs as installed, they will become available as ways to export to or import from .DOCX as well as .ODT formats.

(Updated 09/26/2018, 21h50 … )

(As of 05/28/2018, 1h00 : )

Continue reading tex4ht / mk4ht Broken (Problem Solved).

I’ve just installed LaTeX on my Android / Linux tablet.

In This Posting, I roughly explained how I was able to install Linux on my Samsung Galaxy Tab S.

Since then, the Linux software that I was able to install, and which works, include, among other applications,

  • GIMP
  • Blender
  • LibreOffice (a Comprehensive Install)
  • InkScape
  • GVim
  • MPlayer (Video With Sound)
  • LaTeX
  • LyX (A Word-Processor based on LaTeX, and not quite WYSIWYG)
  • (a Graphical LaTeX Code-Editor)
  • ‘Dia’ (a Useful Diagram-Editor)
  • Miscellaneous Diagram-Drawing Software (that uses LaTeX as a Back-End)
  • wxMaxima (a Computer Algebra System with GUI)
  • GNUPlot (Gives 3D Plots)
  • Yacas (Yet Another Computer Algebra System)
  • ‘mkvtoolnix-gui’ (A video-file concatenation tool)

But, doing so also consumed several GB of storage, even though that tablet only has 16GB of storage. Currently, my Linux guest-system is taking up 4.41GB.

screenshot_2017-09-28-16-23-54

(Updated 10/08/2017 : )

Continue reading I’ve just installed LaTeX on my Android / Linux tablet.