An Alternative to OpenShot under Linux

In the past, I used to be a fan of the non-linear video editor named “OpenShot”. It is the kind of editor which allows for multiple source clips to be added to multiple, parallel timelines, and for transitions and effects to be added, to put those together into a longer video presentation. One could say that OpenShot was a software-end to the process of compositing. In the past, I had even custom-compiled version 1.1 of OpenShot on the Linux computer I name ‘Walnut’, and gotten that into a state in which it could be used. This means that I did not write the source code in any way, but that I did overlook a lengthy process, by which this source code could be translated into an executable program, on a platform which would not ordinarily have supported it. However, v1.1 still lacked many of the features which later versions claim to have, and that eventually become necessary. V1.1 did not have the Blue-Screen or Green-Screen, Chroma-Key effect.

These days, OpenShot v1.4.3 is directly available through the (Linux) package manager under Debian / Jessie. But I don’t use it, mainly because I cannot. I seem to have discovered that there are major stability issues with recent versions of this video editor. On my Linux box named ‘Phoenix’, this video editor actually caused my desktop to freeze – not once but three times. Almost all my other, package-installed software, is comparatively well-behaved, and I have no other reason to think, that my graphics chipset is in any way faulty.

Under Linux, even a defective application run in user space, should not be able to get the desktop to freeze.

There is also a Windows version, v2.0.6, which I next tried to install on the Windows 7 computer named ‘Mithral’. I did not like the fact to begin with, that this is the type of install which asks the user to reboot Windows for the changes to take effect. But then I also found that the Windows version would constantly crash. Next, having OpenShot v2.0.6 installed under Windows, actually prevented a ‘GPG4Win’ application named “Kleopatra” from working on ‘Mithral’. This last detail worries me.

Yet, after I uninstalled OpenShot from the Windows computer and rebooted again, Kleopatra was working again.

And so the bottom line for me is, that this once-great video editor is now too unstable to be used.

On the Debian / Jessie, Linux computer named ‘Phoenix’, I can use “Kdenlive” instead, which does more or less what OpenShot was supposed to do, and which does these things without crashing. Kdenlive also offers the user to place video clips he supplies into multiple timelines, and to apply transitions and effects, and does include the “Blue Screen” (alpha / translucency) effect.

But under Windows, I can still only see paid-for solutions to this need.

Dirk