ChromeOS Upgrade from Debian 9 to Debian 10 – aka Buster – Google Script crashed.

I have one of those Chromebooks, which allow a Linux subsystem to be installed, that subsystem being referred to in the Google world as “Crostini”. It takes the form of a Virtual Machine, which mounts a Container. That container provides the logical hard drive of the VM’s Guest System. What Google had done at some point in the past was, to install Debian 9 / Stretch as the Linux version, in a simplified, automated way. But, because Debian Stretch is being replaced by Debian 10 / Buster, the option also exists, to upgrade the Linux Guest System to Buster. Only, while the option to do so manually was always available to knowledgeable users, with the recent Update of ChromeOS, Google insists that the user perform the upgrade, and provides ‘an easy script’ to do so. The user is prompted to click on something in his ChromeOS settings panel.

What happened to me, and what may also happen to my readers is, that this script crashes, and leaves the user with a ChromeOS window, that has a big red symbol displayed, to indicate that the upgrade failed. I failed to take a screen-shot of what this looks like. The button to offer the upgrade again, is thankfully taken away at that point. But, if he or she reaches that point, the user will need to decide what to do next, out of essentially two options:

  • Delete the Linux Container, and set up a new one from scratch. In that case, everything that was installed to, or stored within Linux will be lost. Or,
  • Try to complete the upgrade in spite of the failed script.

I chose to do the latter. The Linux O/S has its own method of performing such an upgrade. I would estimate that the reason for which the script crashed on me, might have been Google’s Expectation that my Linux Guest System might have 200-300 packages installed, when in fact I have a much more complete Linux system, with over 1000 packages installed, including services and other packages that ask for configuration options. At some point, the Google Script hangs, because the Linux O/S is asking an unexpected question. Also, while the easy button has a check-mark checked by default, to back up the Guest System’s files before performing the upgrade, I intentionally unchecked that, simply over the knowledge that I do not have sufficient storage on the Chromebook, to back up the Guest System.

I proceeded on the assumption, that what the Google script did first was, to change the contents of the file ‘/etc/apt/sources.list’, as well as of the directory ‘/etc/apt/sources.list.d’, to specify the new software sources, associated with Debian Buster as opposed to Debian Stretch. At that point, the Google script should also have set up, whatever it is that makes Crostini different from stock Linux. Only, once in the middle of the upgrade that follows, the Google script hanged.

(Updated 10/25/2020, 22h55… )

Continue reading ChromeOS Upgrade from Debian 9 to Debian 10 – aka Buster – Google Script crashed.

Major Problem when Upgrading a UserLAnd Linux Guest System via ‘apt-get’.

A fact which I had blogged about before was, that I had installed a Debian 10 Linux Guest System on the Android, Google Pixel C Tablet, using the Android app ‘UserLAnd’. This Debian 10 version was compiled by the package maintainers to run on an ARM-64 CPU.

Well, along with major updates to Debian 9 / Stretch, the Debian maintainers have just issued an update to Debian 10 / Buster, from version 10.0 to version 10.1 . The problem? When trying to perform the upgrade via ‘sudo apt-get’, the process hangs over the attempt to update or install ‘systemd’, and then configure it. Apparently, doing this requires full root privileges, because ‘systemd’ would normally control how services run in the background with ‘root’, but UserLAnd does not allow any part of its Guest System to run as ‘root’.

This could become a stumbling-block, in any future updates.

The ‘solution’ which I attempted to apply was, to remove everything that depends on ‘systemd’, and to re-apply the upgrade in total. But the net effect of that is, to remove many more packages than I intended to remove, including all things related to ‘Gtk 3′, ‘LXTerminal’, as well as key components that allow ‘LXDE’, the Lightweight Desktop Manager, to function at all.

Caution: This would have been a completely unsafe thing to do on a real computer, and was only plausible because the setup in question was virtual in some way, and also expendable. This would normally brick the computer…

When the makers of UserLAnd provided easy screen-shortcuts to install Debian and LXDE, they knew how to modify the installation script, to ignore whatever problems result from installing LXDE and its dependencies in a ‘proot’ed environment. But I don’t know those tricks. (:1) So at one point I had a partially gutted system, without LXDE really installed.

But the (Android) devs behind UserLAnd also provided a quick workaround for that problem. The next time I exited the corrupted session, and re-launched LXDE from the UserLAnd menu, this Android app recognized that LXDE was no longer installed, and simply reinstalled it for me, after which I could access it again.

Once I had done this, my wallpaper was a black background, and quite a few of the installed applications were no longer installed. And so what I needed to do next was, to run the equivalent of the following command:

 


$ sudo apt-get install gnome-backgrounds clipit evince wxmaxima gcl firefox-esr libpam-cracklib

 

After having done this, I was able to select a wallpaper again, from the file chooser, and to regain most of the abilities I already had before.

I might still be missing some of the applications I once had.

But what all this suggests is, that the Linux Guest System should only consist of a vest-pocket system, with a small number of applications, because in reality any and all Linux applications may simply need to be reinstalled at some point in time. But, there is a way in which users are not ‘hosed’ if this happens:

Linux still segregates its data into a system directory, and a user home directory. Even though we have no form of access control within a ‘proot’ed system, even if certain applications are removed from the system directory, and then reinstalled there, our home directory will remember all our personal settings and data.

So the solution can be as quick as the initial disaster was.

My Linux Guest System is now down to taking up 4.86GB of Android application-data.


 

(Updated 9/09/2019, 16h15 … )

(As of 9/07/2019, 20h00 : )

I think I’ve gotten closer to finding out, what went wrong…

Continue reading Major Problem when Upgrading a UserLAnd Linux Guest System via ‘apt-get’.

Choosing dist-upgrade Over upgrade

Under Linux, the command

apt-get update

Is safe, and only refreshes the packages list stored on the client, to reflect changes that have been made in the repository. OTOH,

apt-get upgrade

Tells the package manager, simply to upgrade all packages, which have newer versions in the lists, from the versions currently installed. In principle, this sounds logically correct. But there is an alternative to this, which is called

apt-get dist-upgrade

The difference is, that ‘dist-upgrade’ is smarter than ‘upgrade‘ about global changes that might take place, due to changes in the overall Debian Distribution – hence the ‘dist’ – which can affect which directories files and configuration changes need to be stored to.

In practice, ‘d-u’ is always safer than just ‘upgrade‘, and does everything ‘upgrade’ is supposed to do. Therefore, we generally give the command

apt-get dist-upgrade

Dirk

 

One Reason I now Feel that the Linux Update Process is Stable

Back in past years, the habit I had had with my Linux computers was such, that I would not do a complete upgrade of all installed packages. Instead, I would often tell my package manager to install some new packages, and view the message it generated, according to which many packages were to be held back and not updated, as part of the new installation. I used to acknowledge this in general, and allow it to happen.

By contrast, I did notice how often Windows Update does its job, and how my Windows computers were never or seldom broken by a Windows Update. However, it had happened to me on occasion, that the Linux computers could get into some sort of stability issue, over upgrades I had done. And so I had reached the vague conclusion, that Windows Update was somehow better, than the habit of doing complete upgrades under Linux.

What I now have is two computers, on which all the packages I have installed are at their most recent version, due to the ‘unattended-upgrades‘ package which I have installed, and which I wrote before in This Earlier Posting.

What I now find, is that my Linux computers that are up-to-date, are at least as stable as my Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 machines, if not more stable. And so advice which I was once given but had ignored, seems to have been accurate, according to which my earlier practice of only upgrading a minimum of libraries, was a bad practice, and according to which doing so, introduced stability problems of its own.

Having said that, If we are given a Debian / Linux machine which requires upgrades to a large number of packages, let us say to more than 20 packages, then we effectively need to do a ‘dist-upgrade‘ to achieve that most reliably, and even then, this one-time action can fail, and can leave us with an unstable or broken system.

Dirk