Getting the integrated equalizer to work, from Debian Jessie, KDE 4.

I happen to have an older laptop, which I name ‘Klystron’, that is running Debian 8 / Jessie, with KDE 4 as its desktop manager. Don’t ask me why, but I tend to leave older builds of Linux running on some of my computers, just because they seem to be running without any deficiencies.

That laptop has lousy speakers. I decided a few days ago, that it would benefit, if I could get the 14-band graphical equalizer to work, that is generally available on Linux computers which, like that laptop, use the ‘PulseAudio’ sound server. However, on this old version of Linux, achieving that was a bit harder than it’s supposed to be. Yet, because I succeeded, I felt that I should share with the community, what the steps were, needed to succeed.

First of all, this is what the equalizer looks like, which I can now open on that laptop:

Equalizer_1

And it works!

 

In order to get this sort of equalizer working with PulseAudio, eventually, the following two modules need to be loaded:

module-equalizer-sink

module-dbus-protocol

And, if I gave the command ‘load-module…’ naively from the command-line, as user, because under my builds of Linux, PulseAudio runs in user mode, both these modules seem to load fine, without my having to install any additional packages.

On more recent builds of Linux, one needs to install the package ‘pulseaudio-equalizer’ to obtain this feature, or some similarly-named package. But, because these two modules just loaded fine under Debian / Jessie, I guess the functionality once came integrated with PulseAudio.

But I soon started to run in to trouble with these modules, and discovered why, then, the equalizer function was not set up to run out-of-the-box…

(Updated 6/26/2020, 10h30… )

Continue reading Getting the integrated equalizer to work, from Debian Jessie, KDE 4.

LXDE and Plasma 5 .desktop -Files don’t meet the same requirements.

I’ve just switched a Linux computer of mine from the LXDE to the Plasma 5 desktop managers, because Plasma 5, the successor to KDE 4, is infinitely more-powerful. But then there were some issues with the transition, that may be relevant to my readers, if the readers also wish to switch desktop-managers, on an installed Linux computer.

One fact which I learned, was that even though LXDE and Plasma 5 both use .desktop -Files to launch applications, each system’s .desktop Files are different.

There is a directory named:

‘~/.config/autostart’

In which we find .desktop -Files that are to be run when the user first logs in. And we may find that the initial log-ins don’t run those files:

screenshot_20171017_083544

Also, because the configuration in question is just a set of files, trying to click on these entriesĀ  in the Plasma 5 settings center does not enable them.

One main reason for which this happens, is the fact that the professional who set up these configuration files, gave the original ones a line that goes like this:

OnlyShowIn=XFCE;LXDE;LXQt;

On my system, this fact was a life-saver, because the LXDE version initially had Compiz installed, which is a fun compositor, but which is not compatible with KDE or Plasma 5. If that had launched, it would have messed up my first attempt to establish a Plasma 5 session.

But there exist other applications which I’d want to have run, even if I’m logging in to Plasma 5, for which reason I used the GUI, to create a Plasma 5 -compatible launcher for the script that updates my version of Flash to the latest version:

screenshot_20171017_083357

And I edited-in a line with a text-editor, which now goes:

OnlyShowIn=KDE;

The exact appearance of the icons here is purely coincidental. But if we wanted to transfer such scripts to:

‘/etc/skel’

Then a big problem for a user like me would be, that scripts which we created in our own home-folders, are likely to contain configuration-details, which will only work for the one user who created them. And so I kept this .desktop -File spartan, to make sure that it will work, regardless of whose home-folder it eventually ends up in.

Dirk