Major Update, On Computer ‘Plato’

(As of 20h30 : )

One fact which may confuse some of my readers, is that I have more than one computer. The server of my Web-site and blog, is a Debian / Jessie, Debian 8 system called ‘Phoenix’.

But a much-more interesting computer is a Debian / Stretch, Debian 9 system called ‘Plato’. That is an early, 8-core machine with 12GB of RAM, which does not act as much of a server, but that has an NVidia GeForce GTX460 graphics card, with proprietary drivers.

This evening, ‘Plato’ received a set of updates, that both upgraded its Linux version from Debian 9.4 to Debian 9.5, as well as upgrading its graphics drivers. Aside from some minor misbehavior before the required reboot, the updates seemed to take place smoothly. However, I must now test my graphics capabilities, and all things related to its GPU.

‘Plato’ also received an update to its CUDA drivers.

(Update 21h10 : )

On the computer I name ‘Plato’, I can still play the game ‘Quern – Undying Thoughts’ (through my Steam account), and The LuxCore Render still works, which verifies my OpenCL capabilities.

I never did a thorough test of the CUDA capabilities, but because my NVidia control panel still tells me I have 336 CUDA cores, I’m assuming its basic functionality is still intact.

Dirk

 

Problems getting LuxCoreRender to work on one of my computers.

In This Earlier Posting, I had written that I had used a benchmarking tool named “LuxMark”, to test whether my GPU even works, on the computer which I name ‘Plato’. In the process, I ran across the discovery, that there exists a type of rendering-engine named ‘LuxCoreRenderer’, which is a ray-tracer, but which will do its ray-tracing with code, that runs under OpenCL.

I had assumed that the benchmarking tool was free, but that users would need to be paying customers, before they can use ‘LuxCoreRender’, to render their own scenes. To my great approval I’ve discovered that LuxRender and LuxCoreRender are also, Free, Open-Source Software. :-D  But to my disappointment I’ve learned, that there is no feasible way in which I could use that, on ‘Plato’.

The reason is fairly straightforward. The devs have renamed their renderer, from LuxRender to LuxCoreRender, at which point they also carried out a rebuild of their code, so that version 1.6 was discontinued, and ‘a cleaner build’ was started, as version 2.x . In order to make practical use of a rendering engine, I need a GUI, to create scenes for that engine to render. Well, LuxCoreRender has as minimum requirement, Blender v2.79b , while the Blender-version I have installed on ‘Plato’ is only v2.78a . The requirements that the devs state is strict, because Blender versions before 2.79 contained a bug, which would cause crashes. Not only that, but in this case, a user-space application would crash, for which there are considerable processes running on the GPU, which can cause severe memory-leaks, as I wrote Here.

Now, there does exist a stand-alone version of LuxCoreRender, v2.x , which in fact runs on ‘Plato’, but which remains rather useless to me, because it can only load and then render scene-descriptions, which have been stored to a file which is totally based on Lux, and not on any other standards.

Continue reading Problems getting LuxCoreRender to work on one of my computers.

I’ve finally installed the proprietary nVidia graphics drivers.

In this earlier posting, I had written about the fact that the project was risky, to switch from the open-source ‘Nouveau’ graphics drivers, which are provided by a set of packages under Debian / Linux that contain the word ‘Mesa’, to the proprietary ‘nVidia’ drivers. So risky, that for a long time I faltered at doing this.

Well just this evening I made the switch. Under Debian / Stretch – aka Debian 9, this switch is relatively straightforward to accomplish. What we do is to switch to a text-session, using <Ctrl>+<Alt>+F1, and then kill the X-server. From there, we essentially just need to give the command (as root):

apt-get install nvidia-driver nvidia-settings nvidia-xconfig

Giving this command essentially allows the Debian package-managers to perform all the post-install steps, such as black-listing the Nouveau drivers. One should expect that this command has much work as its side-effects, as it pulls in quite a few dependencies.

(Edit 04/30/2018 :

In addition, the user must have up-to-date kernel / Linux -headers installed, because to install the graphics driver, also requires to build DKMS kernel modules. But, it’s always my assumption that I’d have kernel headers installed myself. )

When I gave this command the first time, apt-get suggested additional packages to me, which I wrote down on a sheet of paper. And then I answered ‘No’ to the question of whether or not to proceed (without those), so that I could add all the suggested packages onto a new command-line.

(Update 05/05/2018 :

The additional, suggested packages which I mentioned above, offer the ‘GLVND’ version of GLX. With nVidia, there are actually two ways to deliver GLX, one of which is an nVidia-centered way, and the other of which is a generic way. ‘GLVND’ provides the generic way. It’s also potentially more-useful, if later-on, we might  want to install the 32-bit versions as well.

However, if we fail to add any other packages to the command-line, then, the graphics-driver will load, but we won’t have any OpenGL capabilities at all. Some version of GLX must also be installed, and my package manager just happened to suggest the ‘GLVND’ packages.

Without OpenGL at all, the reader will be very disappointed, especially since even his desktop-compositing will not be running – at first.

The all-nVidia packages, which are not the ‘GLVND’ packages, offer certain primitive inputs from user-space applications, which ‘GLVND’ does not implement, because those instructions are not generically a part of OpenGL. Yet, certain applications do exist, which require the non-‘GLVND’ versions of GLX to be installed, and I leave it up to the reader to find out which packages do that – if the reader needs them – and to write their names on a sheet of paper, prior to switching drivers.

It should be noted, that once we’ve decided to switch to either ‘GLVND’- or the other- version of GLX, trying to change our minds, and to switch to the other version, is yet another nightmare, which I have not even contemplated so far. I’m content with the ‘GLVND’- GLX version. )

(Edited 04/30/2018 :

There is one aspect to installing up-to-date nVidia drivers which I should mention. The GeForce GTX460 graphics card does not support 3rd-party frame-buffers. These 3rd-party frame-buffer drivers would normally allow, <Ctrl>+<Alt>+F1, to show us not only a text-session, but one with decent resolution. Well, with the older, legacy graphics-chips, what I’d normally do is to use the ‘uvesafb’ frame-buffer drivers, just to obtain that. With modern nVidia hardware and drivers, this frame-buffer driver is incompatible. It even causes crashes, because with it, essentially, two drivers are trying to control the same hardware.

Just this evening, I tried to get ‘uvesafb’ working one more time, to no avail, just as it does work on the computer I name ‘Phoenix’. )

So the way it looks now for me, the text-sessions are available, but only in very low resolution. They only exist for emergencies now.

But this is the net result I obtained, after I had disabled the ‘uvesafb’ kernel module again:

 


dirk@Plato:~$ infobash -v
Host/Kernel/OS  "Plato" running Linux 4.9.0-6-amd64 x86_64 [ Kanotix steelfire-nightly Steelfire64 171013a LXDE ]
CPU Info        8x Intel Core i7 950 @ clocked at Min:1600.000Mhz Max:2667.000Mhz
Videocard       NVIDIA GF104 [GeForce GTX 460]  X.Org 1.19.2  [ 1920x1080 ]
Processes 262 | Uptime 1:16 | Memory 3003.9/12009.6MB | HDD Size 2000GB (6%used) | GLX Renderer GeForce GTX 460/PCIe/SSE2 | GLX Version 4.5.0 NVIDIA 375.82 | Client Shell | Infobash v2.67.2
dirk@Plato:~$

dirk@Plato:~$ clinfo | grep units
  Max compute units                               7
dirk@Plato:~$ clinfo | grep multiple
  Preferred work group size multiple              32
dirk@Plato:~$ clinfo | grep Warp
  Warp size (NV)                                  32
dirk@Plato:~$


 

So what this means in practice, is that I have OpenGL 4.5 on the computer named ‘Plato’ now, as well as having a fully-functional install of ‘OpenCL‘ and ‘CUDA‘, contrarily to what I had according to this earlier posting.

Therefore, GPU-computing will not just exist in theory for me now, but also in practice.

And this displays, that the graphics card on that machine ‘only’ possesses 224 cores after all, not the 7×48 which I had expected earlier, according to a Windows-based tool – no longer installed.

(Updated 04/29/2018 … )

Continue reading I’ve finally installed the proprietary nVidia graphics drivers.

“Help! No Volume Mute under Plasma 5!”

One of the subjects I blog about, is a computer I named ‘Plato’, which is running Debian / Stretch (Debian 9), and the desktop manager of which is Plasma 5, which is the successor to KDE 4.x .

One of the features which KDE 4 definitely had, was an icon in the notification-tray, from which we could control our volume levels easily, as well as to mute the sound temporarily, eventually to be unmuted again, at which point the earlier, unmuted settings should be remembered. At first glance it would seem that Plasma 5 has done away with this capability. Trying to solve this can cause people to spend hours searching the Internet, changing their Plasma 5 preferences, and maybe even forgetting their Plasma 5 preferences, because they disabled all their System Sounds from there.

Recently, I was on a fact-finding mission about this, and am willing to share my solutions.

Under Plasma 5, we really only need to have 2 packages installed, in order to control our volume-levels, etc., assuming that we have gotten our hardware recognized first. Those packages would be:

  1. ‘plasma-pa’
  2. ‘pavucontrol’

The first of these packages integrates with Plasma, and is also responsible for the icon in the notification tray. The second package gives us more control, over our sound-levels specifically, since Plasma 5 uses the Pulse Audio sound-server by default.

If we can see the icon in the notification tray, then a detail which we may overlook after we left-click on that icon, is a tiny little loudspeaker-symbol, on the left end of one of the volume sliders:

screenshot_20180423_150952_c

Left-clicking on this little symbol will cause the volume-bar to the right of it to become slightly pale, which will mean, that the device in question has been muted. I’m saying that ‘we’ could overlook that we even have this feature, because earlier, ‘I’ did not know that I have this feature.

But, this is only what the ‘plasma-pa’ package can show us. The ‘pavucontrol’ package gives us the ability to fine-tune our sound-levels as shown below:

screenshot_20180423_151117

Now, there’s an aspect to how this setup now works, which is slightly more complicated than how KDE 4 used to handle it. The Pulse Audio server attempts to adjust playback as well as recording levels, on a per-application basis. Thus, the view above is almost empty, because there were no applications playing back any sounds, at the moment I recorded this screen-shot.

A frustrating fact which can exist with this, is that some applications will only play a sound for 2 seconds, during which an additional volume-bar appears in the GUI, and after which that volume-bar disappears again, even if we did not have enough time to adjust one volume level. This happens to result from the design-decision, that volume-control should exist at the per-application level. Hence, even if we use media-control keys on our keyboard, those keys will only affect the one main application which happens to be playing, at any given moment. They won’t affect System Sounds.

But this description might sound like I have to say, ‘There is no problem,’ when in fact, under Debian / Stretch, There Is a problem. That problem, as I see it, lies in the fact that by default, the one volume-bar which the GUI has shown above, for all System Sounds, may not even work.

(Updated 04/26/2018 … )

Continue reading “Help! No Volume Mute under Plasma 5!”