Debian WordPress recently received an update.

One of the facts which I’ve blogged about before, is exactly, what blogging platform I’m presently using. I subscribe more to ‘WordPress.org’, and less to ‘WordPress.com’.

This synopsis is a bit over-simplified. The actual WordPress version I have installed is the one that ships with Debian / Jessie, aka Debian 8, from the package manager. But that doesn’t mean we don’t receive security updates. I actually tend to trust the Debian Maintainers more, than WordPress.org, to keep the platform secure. They’ll downright snub features, if they find the feature poses any sort of security threat.

And in recent days, this Debian build of WordPress did receive such a routine update. The main reason I take notice of such things is, the fact that my personal WordPress installation is modified somewhat, from what the package maintainers build. This still allows me to download a modest set of plug-ins from WordPress.org, as well as one plug-in from WordPress.com.

I’m happy to say that no snarl took place, between the recent Debian-based update, and my custom-configured blogging platform. Service was never disrupted.

Dirk

 

How to Add a Web-browser to GNURoot + XSDL.

In This earlier posting – out of several – I had explained, that I’ve installed the Android apps “GNURoot Debian” and “XSDL” to my old Samsung Galaxy Tab S (first generation). The purpose is, to install Linux software on that tablet, without requiring that I root it. This uses the Android variant of ‘chroot’, which is actually also called ‘proot’, and is quick and painless.

However, there are certain things which a ch-rooted Linux system cannot do. One of them is to start services to run in the background. Another is, to access hardware, as doing the latter would require access to the host’s ‘/dev’ folder, not the local, ch-root’s ‘/dev’ folder. Finally, because XSDL is acting as my X-server, when GNURoot’s guest-software tries to connect to one, there will be no hardware-acceleration, because this X-server is really just an Android app, and does not really correspond to a display device.

This last detail can be quite challenging, because in today’s world, even many Linux applications require, direct-rendering, and will not function properly, if left just to use X-server protocol, à la legacy-Unix. One such application is any serious Web-browser.

This does not result from any malfunction of either Android app, because it just follows from the logic, of what the apps are being asked to do.

But we’d like to have a Web-browser installed, and will find that “Firefox”, “Arora” etc., all fail over this issue. This initially leaves us in an untenable situation, because even if we were not to use our Linux guest-system for Web-browsing – because there is a ‘real’ Web-browser installed on the (Android) host-system – the happenstance can take place, by which a Web-document needs to be viewed anyway – let’s say, because we want to click on an HTML-file, that constitutes the online documentation for some Linux-application.

What can we do?

Continue reading How to Add a Web-browser to GNURoot + XSDL.

I now have Linux installed on my Samsung Galaxy Tab S.

A fact which I had lamented about, was that my Samsung Galaxy Tab S, First Generation – Android tablet – had essentially crashed. Its behavior had gotten so unstable as to make it unusable.

What this also did – given that I have a working Pixel C – was make the software / firmware -installation on the Tab S expendable, which meant that as soon as I was over the loss, I found myself willing to experiment with it.

So I did a factory reset, which made it stable again, at the expense of deleting all my user-data and separately-installed apps from Google Play. Essentially, the tablet had crashed while I was doing a routine update of apps, for which reason the FS corruption was limited to the ‘/sdcard’ partition, where user-installed apps are stored, as well as perhaps, to the ‘/data’ partition, where application data is stored. The factory reset empties those, and, because no system software update was taking place at the time of the crash, the ‘/system’ and ‘/boot’ partitions probably did not suffer from any corruption.

Then, I installed Linux on that tablet, using the Google Play store app named “GNURoot“, as well as using the Google Play store app named “XSDL“. When we install Linux on Android-capable hardware, we need to have a working Android system on that as well, because only the Android software can really provide the display drivers, and the I/O.

XSDL is an Android app which emulates a Linux X-server, which Linux sessions could connect to, as long as the Linux sessions can be persuaded not to try launching their own X-server instance, which their packages tend to depend on.

GNURoot is an app for Android 6+ that allows Debian / Jessie packages to be installed directly to the Android File System, and which runs those packages as though it was Linux. Remarkably, it does not require the device be rooted. It also uses the Android kernel. With the correct packages installed, it’s possible to get a proper desktop-session going between ‘GNURoot’ and ‘XSDL’. But the process is not user-friendly.

At first I had tried to install a system of ~400 packages, that provide ‘XFCE’, only to find that this desktop-manager could not connect to the ‘XSDL’, X-server, at least in any way I could get working. But then I tried uninstalling ‘GNURoot’, reinstalling ‘GNURoot’, and then installing the packages for ‘LXDE’, which is a lightweight, yet better desktop manager than the older XFCE would have been. This time, doing so required I patiently install ~600 packages.

Apparently, LXDE could be told to connect to an ‘XSDL’ instance quite well, and I obtained a working desktop-session. I also installed “GIMP” and “Blender”, which both ran fine – even on my Android tablet !

screenshot_2017-09-24-06-00-25

screenshot_2017-09-24-05-59-53

There was one caveat to using this configuration however, which is that I absolutely needed to connect an external, Bluetooth mouse, as well as an external Keyboard. Apparently, the ability of ‘XSDL’ to provide virtual replacements for those, just wasn’t up to snuff.

(Updated 10/04/2017 : )

Continue reading I now have Linux installed on my Samsung Galaxy Tab S.