Installing a “Wacom” graphics / digitizer tablet under Linux.

I’ve just received my “Wacom Intuos PT S 2″ digitizer tablet – aka graphics tablet – which I had specifically bought, because there is some support for the Wacom series of tablets under Linux. I was able to get it working 100%, and also did get the ‘wireless kit’ to work, that I had ordered with it.

Under Linux, we need to have at least these two packages installed, in order to get this hardware to work:

  • ‘xserver-xorg-input-wacom’
  • ‘libwacom2′

If available, the following should also be installed:

  • ‘libwacom-bin’

Additionally I should mention that I did this on the Debian / Stretch computer I name ‘Plato’, on which I have Plasma 5 as my desktop manager. Although Debian and Linux do support Wacom, apparently, Plasma 5 as such does not. This effectively means that individual applications may have tablet-support, but that We’re not given a graphical module for the System Settings panel, from which to customize our tablet. For that reason, I needed to write a shell-script which does this for me:

 

#!/bin/bash

xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Finger touch" Touch off
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pen stylus" Button 2 key "shift"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pen stylus" Button 3 key "ctrl"

xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pad pad" Button 1 key "button +3"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pad pad" Button 3 key "del"


xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pad pad" Button 8 key "ctrl" "c"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pad pad" Button 9 key "ctrl" "v"

xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Finger touch" Touch off
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pen stylus" Button 2 key "shift"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pen stylus" Button 3 key "ctrl"

xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pad pad" Button 1 key "button +3"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pad pad" Button 3 key "del"


xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pad pad" Button 8 key "ctrl" "c"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pad pad" Button 9 key "ctrl" "v"

 

Presumably, any other users with Plasma 5 desktop-managers will need to write similar scripts. Simply typing in the command ‘xsetwacom’ without any arguments, will display its basic usage.

It should also be noted, that after an X-server module has been installed, that will act as the input driver, at the very least, the X-server also needs to be restarted, before that driver will be loaded.

(Updated 8/18/2019 : )

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Revisiting HTML, this time, With CSS.

When I first taught myself HTML, it was in the 1990s, and not only has the technology advanced, but the philosophy behind Web-design has also changed. The original philosophy was, that the Web-page should only contain the information, and that each Web-browser should define in what style that information should be displayed. But of course, when Cascading Style-Sheets were invented – which in today’s laconic vocabulary are just referred to as “Styles” – they represented a full reversal of that philosophy, since by nature, they control the very appearance of the page, from the server.

My own knowledge of HTML has been somewhat limited. I’ve bought cuspy books about ‘CSS’ as well as about ‘JQuery’, but have never made the effort to read each book from beginning to end. I mainly focused on what some key concepts are, in HTML5 and CSS.

Well recently I’ve become interested in HTML5 and CSS again, and have found, that to buy the Basic license of a WYSIWYG-editor named “BlueGriffon“, proved informative. I do have access to some open-source HTML editors, but find that even if they come as a WYSIWIG-editor, they mainly tend to produce static pages, very similar to what Web-masters were already creating in the 1990s. In the open-source domain, maybe a better example would be “SeaMonkey“. Beyond that, ‘KompoZer‘ can no longer be made to run on up-to-date 64-bit systems, and while “BlueFish”, a pronouncedly KDE-centric solution available from the package-manager, does offer advanced capabilities, it only does so in the form of an IDE.

(Updated 03/09/2018, 17h10 : )

Continue reading Revisiting HTML, this time, With CSS.

KdeWallet, and Using Smb4K, under Plasma 5

One fact which I’ve written about before, is that I have an up-to-date Linux computer, that uses the ‘Plasma 5′ desktop manager, which is actually the successor to ‘KDE 4′. When using this desktop manager, we can still install numerous packages that ‘belong’ to the old, KDE 4, and most of them will continue to work. One of those is ‘smb4k’, which is a point-and-click utility, to mount a network SMB share – aka, a Windows-file-share, such that it will be visible in our home folder, as though that share was a local sub-folder.

There exist command-line methods to do the same thing, which would mount that network share, and declare it’s of the ‘cifs’ file-system-type, but the use of a simple GUI to do so may be easier.

But then one problem which ensues, is that Smb4K will use the KDE 4 Wallet, to store our password, for that share. It will function in this way, by depending on the package ‘kde-runtime’. In truth, this latter package probably pulls in numerous (old) KDE 4 libraries, and not just the old KWallet, but the existence of this KDE 4 Wallet, on our Plasma 5 machine, is most obvious…

Continue reading KdeWallet, and Using Smb4K, under Plasma 5

I’ve just custom-compiled ‘Aqsis’.

To give some context to this proclamation, I had written an earlier posting, about adapting the non-packaged software named ‘Ayam‘ to Debian / Stretch, that had worked just fine under Debian / Jessie. This is a GUI which constructs complex ‘Renderman‘-Compliant rendering instructions, in this case in the form of .RIB-Files, which in turn, ‘Aqsis’ can turn into 2D perspective views of 3D scenes, that have been software-rendered. OTOH, Ayam itself uses OpenGL and H/W rendering, for its GUI.

What I had found before, was that Ayam did not seem stable anymore under Debian / Stretch. I apologize for this assessment. Under close scrutiny, my computer has revealed, that it was really Aqsis giving the problems, not Ayam. Aqsis is a text-based tool in effect.

Ayam does not specifically need to be used with Aqsis to do its rendering. It can be set up to use other rendering-engines, most of which are quite expensive. Aqsis just happens to be the best Open-Source rendering-engine, whose language Ayam speaks. And at this point I’d say that Ayam is still quite stable, after all, under Debian / Stretch.

As is often the case with such troubles, I next sought to custom-compile Aqsis, to see whether doing so could get rid of its quirks. What were its quirks?

Finally, the only problem with Aqsis was and remains, that it cannot produce a real-time preview of the scene being edited, which it used to provide using a component-program named ‘piqsl’. And the reason why the packaged version of Aqsis does not have ‘piqsl’ under Debian / Stretch, is because this distribution of Linux has a very new ‘Boost’ library ( v1.62 ) , and the visual component to Aqsis, that could produce a display, still relies on the Qt4 libraries and their API, which have begun to bit-rot. The Qt4-specific code of Aqsis cannot parse the newest usage of the Boost libraries, and Debian maintainers have long since discovered this. They are shunning the use of ‘libqt4-dev’ and of ‘libqt4-opengl-dev’ to build any of their packages. So they were effectively forced to package a version of Aqsis, which was missing some important components.

(Updated 12/12/2017 … )

Continue reading I’ve just custom-compiled ‘Aqsis’.