Getting the integrated equalizer to work, from Debian Jessie, KDE 4.

I happen to have an older laptop, which I name ‘Klystron’, that is running Debian 8 / Jessie, with KDE 4 as its desktop manager. Don’t ask me why, but I tend to leave older builds of Linux running on some of my computers, just because they seem to be running without any deficiencies.

That laptop has lousy speakers. I decided a few days ago, that it would benefit, if I could get the 14-band graphical equalizer to work, that is generally available on Linux computers which, like that laptop, use the ‘PulseAudio’ sound server. However, on this old version of Linux, achieving that was a bit harder than it’s supposed to be. Yet, because I succeeded, I felt that I should share with the community, what the steps were, needed to succeed.

First of all, this is what the equalizer looks like, which I can now open on that laptop:

Equalizer_1

And it works!

 

In order to get this sort of equalizer working with PulseAudio, eventually, the following two modules need to be loaded:

module-equalizer-sink

module-dbus-protocol

And, if I gave the command ‘load-module…’ naively from the command-line, as user, because under my builds of Linux, PulseAudio runs in user mode, both these modules seem to load fine, without my having to install any additional packages.

On more recent builds of Linux, one needs to install the package ‘pulseaudio-equalizer’ to obtain this feature, or some similarly-named package. But, because these two modules just loaded fine under Debian / Jessie, I guess the functionality once came integrated with PulseAudio.

But I soon started to run in to trouble with these modules, and discovered why, then, the equalizer function was not set up to run out-of-the-box…

(Updated 6/26/2020, 10h30… )

Continue reading Getting the integrated equalizer to work, from Debian Jessie, KDE 4.

I’ve just installed LaTeX on my Android / Linux tablet.

In This Posting, I roughly explained how I was able to install Linux on my Samsung Galaxy Tab S.

Since then, the Linux software that I was able to install, and which works, include, among other applications,

  • GIMP
  • Blender
  • LibreOffice (a Comprehensive Install)
  • InkScape
  • GVim
  • MPlayer (Video With Sound)
  • LaTeX
  • LyX (A Word-Processor based on LaTeX, and not quite WYSIWYG)
  • (a Graphical LaTeX Code-Editor)
  • ‘Dia’ (a Useful Diagram-Editor)
  • Miscellaneous Diagram-Drawing Software (that uses LaTeX as a Back-End)
  • wxMaxima (a Computer Algebra System with GUI)
  • GNUPlot (Gives 3D Plots)
  • Yacas (Yet Another Computer Algebra System)
  • ‘mkvtoolnix-gui’ (A video-file concatenation tool)

But, doing so also consumed several GB of storage, even though that tablet only has 16GB of storage. Currently, my Linux guest-system is taking up 4.41GB.

screenshot_2017-09-28-16-23-54

(Updated 10/08/2017 : )

Continue reading I’ve just installed LaTeX on my Android / Linux tablet.