Atomic Game Engine Recompiled on Laptop

In This Earlier Posting, I wrote that I had installed a custom-compiled version of the Atomic Game Engine on my Linux laptop named ‘Klystron’.

Well today I recompiled all that, specifically so that I would be able to export any hypothetical games I might want to design with that, to Android, thus testing it thoroughly with my newly-added Android NDK.

I finally have the capability to take games that are written in JavaScript, and to export those either to Linux, to WebGL, or to Android.

Yay!

Dirk

 

Atomic Game Engine Installed – twice

One of the projects which I have recently undertaken, is to compile and install Atomic Game Engine, both on my Linux laptop ‘Klystron’, and on my Windows 7 machine ‘Mithral’. This was originally a closed platform, but has received renewed interest, because it is now available under the MIT license, which is a form of Open-Source licensing, more permissive than GPL v3 is.

This platform has the eventual capability, to deploy 3D applications and games, to Windows, OS/X, Linux, Android, iOS and WebGL recipient-platforms, while some forms of it will run under Windows and Linux, in my own experience.

I have to say though, that my ability to get the Linux version of this game-design platform working, was not due to my own prowess, but rather to the fact that the development team at Atomic Game Engine, provided dedicated and consistent technical support to me, every time I ran into a problem. I would guess they are rather tired of answering my many questions for the moment, so it is also good news, that both under Linux and Windows, my installations of this platform are complete – to my own satisfaction.

I have exported a 3D application to Android from my Windows platform, but have not reproduced this success under Linux, mainly because the platform requires that I specify where my Android SDK and where my Ant executable are located – sensibly – and I do not have any Android SDK presently, installed on ‘Klystron’. I do have the Android SDK installed on ‘Mithral’, which as I said is required, and so the export to Android worked there.

Installation under Windows was much more straightforward than it was under Linux, which is often the case, because the Windows version comes as an available binary SDK, while under Linux it still needs to be custom-compiled. And whenever we custom-compile anything, we can run into dependency issues.

One major issue I faced under Linux, was the fact that the Mono packages that are standard for my Debian distribution, are not adequate in what they provide, for development in C# to be enabled. And so what I needed to do, was to subscribe to another Mono repository, managed by Mono project, to upgrade my whole Mono installation, and after that, C# also worked.

So, Atomic Game Engine allows for 3D applications and games to be designed, using the languages C#, JavaScript, and TypeScript, according to my own experience… But, a C# Project cannot be exported for WebGL playing.

Also, I have discovered along the way, that We are no longer expected to install ‘Visual Studio 2015 Express’, but rather “Visual Studio 2015 Community Edition”, and in order to get C# support to work properly on my Windows 7 machine, I needed to do an in-place upgrade, from ‘VS Express’ to ‘VS Community’.

I am pleased that all the installation and upgrading seems to have gone well, and seems to have left me with no major reliability issues, either on ‘Klystron’ or on ‘Mithral’.

However, because the build of Mono now on ‘Klystron’ is non-standard, I cannot vouch for it in general. On my actual server-box ‘Phoenix’, I must choose to stick with the more conservative Mono packages, that are meant to go with Debian, because this box needs to run reliably 100% of the time. OTOH, on ‘Klystron’, I had nothing else depending on Mono, for which reason I was also willing to do the upgrade.

Dirk

 

I just custom-compiled Ardour 5.3.0

I know an acquaintance, whose name I will protect, who uses “Garage Band” on his Mac, but who has a hard time imagining that there exist many, many different programs like it, for other platforms, and that there must exist such, in order for professional musicians also to have access to a great array of such tools.

Of greater relevance is the fact, that such software exists under Linux as well – not just on Macs or PCs – as well as under Android.

And there is one observation which I would like to add, about what form this takes if users and artists wish to do audio work using Free, Open-Source applications.

Typically, we can access applications that do most of the work that polished, commercial examples offer. But one area in which the free applications do lag behind, is in the availability of sample packs – aka loops – which some artists will use to construct songs.

If Linux developers were to offer those, they would probably also need to ask for money.

Further, Garage Band has it as a specific advantage, that if such loops are simply dropped into the project, this program has the tempo stored, with which that loop was playing by default, in addition to which all DAWs have the tempo of the project set and available. Garage Band will automatically time-stretch the loop, to adapt to the project tempo. Most of the DAW programs I know, do not do this automatically.

A common ability the open-source applications offer though, is to time-stretch the sample manually after importing it, which can be as easy as shift-clicking on one of the edges of the sample and dragging it.

In order for this to be intuitive, it is helpful if the sample has first been processed with a Beat Slicer, so that the exact size of the rectangle will also snap into place with the timing marks on the project view, and the sample-tempo will match the project-tempo.

Shuriken_Klystr_1

Continue reading I just custom-compiled Ardour 5.3.0

I just custom-compiled Tupi.

While I have spent a lot of time pursuing the subject of 3D graphics, obviously, 2D graphics also exist. And there exists an application named ‘Tupi’, which is a toolkit for creating 2D animations, in a cel- or storyboard- kind of way.

I had tried to install the version of Tupi which comes from the package manager for Debian / Jessie, but apparently the Debian Maintainers compiled that, and then did not make sure that it works. This version had a bug, which caused the application to crash, as soon as a new project was created.

So I felt that the only solution – just on the laptop I name ‘Klystron’ – was to custom-compile a later version, which is ‘version 0.2-git07′. This time around, the custom-compilation was somewhat difficult.

One reason for this difficulty was the fact, that the developers specifically neglect Debian builds, and focus on Ubuntu builds. This fact may also have thwarted the Debian Maintainer this time around.

Yet, with much effort, I was able to get the higher version of this application to compile, and also to launch, and to create a new project without crashing. Yaay!

Dirk