Another way to assess quickly, how many computing cores our GPU has.

This posting is on a familiar topic.

On certain Windows computers, there was a popular GUI-based tool named “CPU-Z”, which would give the user fast info about the capabilities of his CPU. Well that application inspired many others, on different platforms, among them, “CUDA-Z”, available for Linux.

If the user has CUDA installed, then he can Download this tool from SourceForge, which is available under Linux as an executable, which can just be put into any directory and run from there. This type of statically-linked executable has come to be known as ‘an app-image’ in the Linux world, but in this case the filename ends with ‘.run’. Below is what mine shows me… Its permission-bits need to be changed to ‘a+x’ after downloading:

Screenshot_20190429_112857

 

I find almost all the information accurate, the only exception being the “Runtime Dll Version”. BTW, Linux computers don’t generally have DLL Files. But I expect that this version-number stems from some internal limitation of the app, as I already know that my Run-Time Version is 8.0.44 .

Dirk

 

Update to Computer Phosphene Last Night

Yesterday evening, a major software update was received to the computer which I name ‘Phosphene’, putting its Debian version to 9.9 from 9.8. One of the main features of the update was, an update to the NVIDIA graphics drivers, as installed from the standard Debian repositories, to version 390.116.

This allows the maximum OpenGL version supported by the drivers to be 4.6.0, and for the first time, I’m noticing that my hardware now limits me to OpenGL 4.5 .

The new driver version does not come with an update to the CUDA version, the latter of which merits some comment. When users install CUDA to Debian / Stretch from the repositories, they obtain run-time version 8.0.44, even though the newly-updated drivers support CUDA all the way up to version 9. This is a shame because CUDA 8.0 cannot be linked to, when compiling code on the GCC / CPP / C++ 6 framework, that is also standard for Debian Stretch. When we want code to run on the GPGPU, we can just load the code onto the GPU using the CUDA run-time v8.0.44, and it runs fine. But if we want to compile major software against the headers, we are locked out. The current Compiler version is too high, for this older CUDA Run-Time version. (:1) (:4)

But on the other side of this irony, I just performed an extension of my own by installing ‘ArrayFire‘ v3.6.3 , coincidentally directly after this update. And my first attempt to do so involved the binary installer that ships with its own CUDA run-time libraries, those being of version 10. Guess what, Driver version 390 is still not high enough to accommodate Run-Time version 10. This resulted in a confusing error message at first, stating that the driver was not high enough, apparently to accommodate the run-time installed system-wide, which would have been bad news for me, as it would have meant a deeply misconfigured setup – and a newly-botched update. It was only after learning that the binary installer for ArrayFire ships with its own CUDA run-time, that I was relieved to know that the┬ásystem-installed run-time, was fine…

Screenshot_20190429_104916

(Updated 4/29/2019, 20h20 … )

Continue reading Update to Computer Phosphene Last Night