I’ve just redone my code signatures today.

One of the habits which I have in my life is, first to undertake a programming project, then to make sure it works, and finally to post some of it on my blog, where I can tell people ‘what I did, to make the project work’. As a result, some of my postings point to a ‘binaries page’, which has the following URL:

https://dirkmittler.homeip.net/binaries/

What gets shown is a table of contents, from which it’s virtually impossible to intuit what each compressed file is actually about. However, individual posts which link there, usually state, which compressed file resulted from the exercise.

Later, I got the idea to compile some of those projects, on behalf of readers who may not know how to do so, AND, to compile a subset again, to run under Windows.

What makes this tricky is the fact that, under Windows, people like me are obliged to put code signatures onto executables. My code signature only identifies me positively, as the author of the program. It doesn’t, by itself, guarantee, that the user won’t get the scary Windows defender message, when he or she double-clicks on the file-icon.

What makes this even tricker with the type of certificate I chose (to use, to sign the .EXE Files), is, that each certificate expires after one year. Even if readers did download the bundles before yesterday (May 12, 2021), the code would absolutely refuse to work, after May 25 this year. Thus, I need to buy a new certificate, and anybody who might want to keep using my programs, also needs to re-download them.

As of today, I have re-signed all the .EXE Files, with a newer certificate, which will ‘only’ expire after May 13, 2022. So, my readers may proceed, if they have used my program(s), and wish to continue doing so.


 

(Update 5/14/2021, 14h30: )

Just to be exact, the certificate which I actually used, has the Serial Number ‘154a757a67e7fd31188adce1474afadc‘.

 

Dirk