Finally getting my FB Messenger Notifications to be Quiet

One of the plans which I had told my contacts about, was that if they send me SMS messages – i.e. phone-texts – the understanding would be that my phone would shout at me, to implore me to answer at once – therefore, for them to use SMS in an emergency.

OTOH, It can happen that one of my friends might like to chat with me, but without causing me to become a distraction to people around me. My phone should notify me noticeably-to-me, but silently. For that purpose, I still recommend that people use Facebook Messenger.

For some time, it was working that way for me, but at some later time, this had stopped working, in that each time I received a FB Messenger Chat Head, my phone had started to give me an audible notification again, which I had some trouble suppressing, in spite of the improvements that Android 7 brought to my Phone!

However, since recent months, I’ve gotten FB Messenger notifications to behave again, exactly as I want them to. And here is how I fixed the problem:

Continue reading Finally getting my FB Messenger Notifications to be Quiet

Chrome For Linux Upgrade Glitch Fixed By Google

One of the facts which I had observed about the Google Chrome browser version, which is meant for Linux, was that Google no longer provides a 32-bit version of its binaries. In keeping with this, Google has also removed the section in its code repository, which would make a 32-bit version available. Hence, I can only be subscribing to the 64-bit upgrades. Yet, my Linux computer ‘Phoenix’ has its package manager set up, to query a repository for both the 64-bit and the 32-bit versions of any package by default, and then to download and install the packages which are relevant.

In this earlier posting, I observed how this can lead to an error message when running ‘apt-get update‘. What I had done, was to make minor configuration changes like so, which I had needed to re-apply, after every upgrade to Chrome.

Well Google has caught up with the scenario which I was describing. As of their latest upgrade, their own ‘cron.daily‘ symlink will properly put the following source into ‘/etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list‘ :


deb [arch=amd64] http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable main

You may note, that the script from Google now includes the ‘[arch=amd64]‘ parameter, which means that I won’t have to make any manual adjustments to this configuration detail of my machine, every time the Chrome browser receives an upgrade.

Thank you, Google!

Dirk

 

How I fixed my Chrome for Linux Package Issue

In a previous posting, I described a specific issue I was having, with my Linux installation of Google Chrome.

I have now found a solution to this exact problem.

Chrome for Linux installs a daily cron job, which resets the file

/etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list

by default. If it is absolutely necessary to override this behavior, let us say because our package manager is set up by default to pull both the 32-bit and the 64-bit contents of any repository, but the latest build of Chrome only supports a 64-bit architecture, then there is a configuration file named

/etc/default/google-chrome

This file defaults to containing


repo_add_once="false"
repo_reenable_on_distupgrade="true"

This can be changed to


repo_add_once="true"
repo_reenable_on_distupgrade="true"

Dirk

(Edit 02/06/2016 : ) Unfortunately, I have discovered that the variables defined in

/etc/default/google-chrome

Do Not change the behavior of the cron job, to rewrite the file

/etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list

And so I found that slightly more aggressive editing was needed by be.

On standard Debian / Linux systems, the daily cron jobs associated with specific packages are stored in the directory

/etc/cron.daily

And there is a symlink in this directory, pointing to a target file, which is the script that Google Chrome runs. I did not take out the symlink. But I have changed the permission bits of the target file, to make that non-executable.

 

A Glitch with the Chrome for Linux Package Repository

One of the software packages I have installed on the computer ‘Phoenix’ is “Google Chrome”, for Debian / Linux. And this package is eligible for upgrades via Package Manager because Google makes the binaries available. In order for the upgrades to take place, an ‘apt-get update’ command needs to succeed, with this file installed:


/etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list

One problem I’ve encountered recently, is that because my computer is set up to pull both the 32-bit and the 64-bit repositories, I get an error message telling me that there is apparently no more 32-bit version on the Google servers. And so the line of code that is needed in this file requires


deb [arch=amd64] http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable main

The only problem though with this, is that as soon as my Chrome package does update, the ‘[arch=amd64]‘ vanishes, because the package overwrites whatever modifications I made to this file.

It could be that this problem has delayed my getting updates through until now. But unless either the Chrome repository starts to include a 32-bit entry again, or until the same package replaces this file with the specification in-place, this problem will eventually recur.

Dirk