Another way to assess quickly, how many computing cores our GPU has.

This posting is on a familiar topic.

On certain Windows computers, there was a popular GUI-based tool named “CPU-Z”, which would give the user fast info about the capabilities of his CPU. Well that application inspired many others, on different platforms, among them, “CUDA-Z”, available for Linux.

If the user has CUDA installed, then he can Download this tool from SourceForge, which is available under Linux as an executable, which can just be put into any directory and run from there. This type of statically-linked executable has come to be known as ‘an app-image’ in the Linux world, but in this case the filename ends with ‘.run’. Below is what mine shows me… Its permission-bits need to be changed to ‘a+x’ after downloading:

Screenshot_20190429_112857

 

I find almost all the information accurate, the only exception being the “Runtime Dll Version”. BTW, Linux computers don’t generally have DLL Files. But I expect that this version-number stems from some internal limitation of the app, as I already know that my Run-Time Version is 8.0.44 .

Dirk

 

OpenShot-Qt Now Cooperates With Wayland Compositing.

One of the subjects which I blogged about before was, that the Debian version of OpenShot at the time, would simply freeze with desktop compositing on. That was the default, GTK version of OpenShot. Further, I can’t vouch for OpenShot under Windows because I think that the way it installs itself is botched. Yet, I am always keen to have such non-linear, 2D video editing applications available.

Well in the present, I have an up-to-date version of OpenShot installed, which is explicitly the Qt-version, installed as the package ‘openshot-qt’ on a Debian / Stretch computer. The main reason fw I have this version working, is the fact that I subscribed the computer I name ‘Phosphene’ to the Debian Multimedia Repository. Without access to this repository, Linux users can sometimes be hosed. In other cases, having its libraries installed can break dependencies with other software.

But this latest Debian Repository version of OpenShot-Qt (2.3.4), for Debian / Stretch, impresses me. Actually, when we first install it, the run-time won’t run, because of a missing library, that being ‘urllib’. This is due to the application package failing to state a dependency. This dependency can be resolved by installing ‘python-requests’ and ‘python3-requests’, which I believe also pulls in ‘python-urllib3′ and ‘python3-urllib3′. After this has been installed, ‘OpenShot-Qt’ runs.

When the developers upgraded their main build of OpenShot to version 2 (+), they needed to rewrite the source code for all the effects of the editor. And for this reason, the up-to-date version only seems to have 7 actual effects, that run over the duration that they’re applied for:

Screenshot_20190224_201216

Such Effects can be applied to a clip, by dragging them onto the clip.

In contrast, because of the flexible way in which this editor defines Transitions – as grey-scale images, it still seems to have an almost unlimited supply of those, that transfer the foreground from one video clip to another (not shown).

But one way in which OpenShot makes up for its small library of 2D /time effects, is by giving its user a very powerful Title Editor, which actually invokes Blender, in order to create renderings of Titles with 3D effects:

(Updated 2/27/2019, 5h50 … )

Continue reading OpenShot-Qt Now Cooperates With Wayland Compositing.