The Sort Of Software that will Not Run, on my Linux Tablet

In this posting I wrote, that I had installed Linux in a chroot-environment, on my old Samsung Galaxy Tab S, First Generation tablet, which remains an Android-based tablet. I did this specifically using the apps from the Google play store, named ‘GNURoot’ and ‘XSDL’, which do not require root.

Here, I gave a compendium of Linux-applications which do run in the resulting Linux guest-system.

I think that I need to point out a broad category of Linux applications that will always remain poor choices:

  • Audio Editors,
  • Video Editors.

The problem with any Audio Editor, is that it will eventually need to input and output Audio – not just edit sound files – and any Video Editor, needs to give a preview of all its video-clips – not just edit video files. This seems like a silly thing to write, but is non-trivial in my present context.

I have taken a Linux engine – GNURoot – and connected it to an externally-supplied X-server emulation – XSDL. The pipeline between these two Android apps is very narrow. It consists of X-server protocol – which is excellent and rendering text and GUIs, of shared memory at its maximum, and of a PulseAudio server, visible on the Linux side as such, but collectively running on the Android side as an SDL client.

I have no way to provide OpenGL or SDL on the Linux-side. What this means, is that virtually any non-linear video editor will want to see both installed on the Linux side, while neither is provided.

Continue reading The Sort Of Software that will Not Run, on my Linux Tablet

System Update to Samsung Galaxy Tab S

One fact which I have blogged about, is that I own a Google, Pixel C. But for many years I’ve also owned a Samsung Galaxy Tab S, First Generation.

On the Tab S, I’ve been running the original O/S. that being Android KitKat, until this morning, when I did a full System Update to Android 6.0.1 / Marshmallow.

Such an update takes time and can be nerve-racking, especially since the process installs a series of system updates, not one, because I’ve left it lagging behind for numerous years.

So now that tablet, too has an up-to-date Android version running on it.

But I’ve previewed Android 6.0.1, 7.0 and 7.0.1 already, because that’s what I’ve been installing on my newer tablet, and on my phone.

I’m happy it’s done with one more time.

Dirk

 

Routine OpenVPN Test Successful Today

On my Home LAN, I host a VPN. Contrarily to what the term might suggest, “OpenVPN” does not stand for a VPN which is Open, nor which anybody might have access to for free. OpenVPN is just one possible protocol for implementing VPN, and is stuffed to the gills with security measures and encryption, which keep unauthorized people out, and which ensure the privacy of the VPN tunnel, which a Client can invoke from outside the LAN, into the LAN.

I possess an OpenVPN client for my Tablet, that receives updates from its developers from time to time. After several updates to the app, I need to test whether it still works, even if at that moment there is no practical need for me ‘to VPN into my LAN’. And just today I found, that indeed this Android app, as well as my server at home, still work 100%.

In order to verify that I have meshed adequately with my LAN, I typically make it a part of the test to ping a computer on that LAN, which is not itself the VPN Server, and to make sure that I get normal ping responses. This also tells me that my specific routing implementation works, beyond the VPN tunnel to the Server itself. My average ping time today was 37 milliseconds.

A VPN is not really a Proxy. If I wanted to change certain settings, I could redirect all my traffic to the Internet at large, through my VPN at home, which is currently still configured to be routed directly from where my Client is located. I was performing my test from a public WiFi hot-spot, so my regular Internet access was still taking place directly from there.

And, because my Home LAN is located in the same jurisdiction as that WiFi hot-spot was, there would also be zero benefit, to my redirecting all my Internet traffic through the VPN, because doing so would gain no special access privileges, geographically, to Internet content anywhere.

Continue reading Routine OpenVPN Test Successful Today