A Word Of Warning about Using tsMuxer And Certain UDF Versions

I have written numerous postings, to guide myself as well as anybody else who might be interested, on the subject of Video-DVD burning, as well as on the subject of Video-Blu-ray burning. According to advice which I gave, it’s possible to use a program named “tsMuxerGUI”, to create the Blu-ray File Structure, which a Blu-ray playback-device will play.

According to additional advice I gave, it’s possible to burn these Blu-rays using some version of ISO-13346, which is also known as ‘UDF’, as opposed to burning them with ISO-9660, as the File System with which data is encoded on the disk.

But what I have noticed, is that certain Blu-rays which were burned in this way, will not play back using the application “VLC”. Normally, the open-source player named VLC can play back Blu-rays, which were commercially produced. So, it would seem natural, that we’d want to test our Blu-rays on the computer we used to create them, with the VLC application as the playback system.

My own experience has been, that the Blu-rays which result play back fine on my Sony Blu-ray playback-device, but do not open on VLC, on my computers.

As unlikely as this may seem, I did after all return to the conclusion, that I’ve created two UDF-encoded Blu-rays, which VLC cannot read, because of the customized UDF-encoding.

Apparently, when we instruct VLC to play a disk inserted into a specific Blu-ray drive, such as perhaps ‘/dev/sr1′, VLC expects to connect directly with the drive, rather than to use the mount-point exclusively, which Linux can create for us.

This is somewhat bewildering, because by default, I need to mount the disk in question, as a regular user, which we can do from the notification tray, before VLC is capable of playing it. But then, whether VLC can in fact read the Blu-ray turns into an independent question, from whether Linux was able to mount it for the rest of the computer to use.

(Edit 10/23/2017 :

There is an even more improbable-sounding possibility, as to why this actually happens. It may be that VLC expects to be able to access the Media Key Block of an inserted Blu-ray Disk, in order to decrypt that, and to start playing back DRM-ed Blu-rays. This would require not only raw access to the disk, but also that such a Block be present on the disk.

If I translate this problem into Human Logic, I’ll get, that ‘VLC’ is only capable of playing Blu-rays that have DRM, when those Blu-rays are also ISO9660-compatible. This may be unfortunate, because even though UDF 2.50 is still not ‘the law of the land’, ISO9660-compatibility may be phased out one day, while DRM likely will not be. )

But there is a workaround. VLC includes in its menus, the ability to Play A Directory. We can choose this option, and can navigate to the mount-point, which we created when we mounted the disk from the notification tray. That mount-point should exist under the directory ‘/media’ , have ‘BDMV’ as one of its sub-folders. And when we then direct VLC to play the folder, that is the parent folder to the ‘BDMV’ sub-folder, we are in fact directing it to play the root-folder of the disk.

And in my own, recent experience, VLC is then able to play the disk. I specifically took care, not to direct VLC to play the folder on my HD, from which I created one of the Blu-rays, but rather the folder that is the mount-point of an actually-inserted disk. Because, it would be pointless to conduct a test, which physically bypasses the disk.

But apparently, when we direct VLC to Play such a Directory, we are forcing it to use whatever ability Linux has to mount the disk, rather than to use whatever ability VLC would otherwise have, to read the disk directly. And then, If our Linux kernel allows us to mount UDF v2.50 File-Systems in read-only form, this will also allow us to preview or fully watch, any Non-DRMed Blu-ray which may have been encoded with that format.

(Edit 10/23/2017 : )

There is some uncertainty, as to whether VLC will also display our Disk Menu correctly. When we select from the dialog-box belonging to VLC, that we wish to play back a Blu-ray, normally a check-box sets itself such, as Not to show the Disk Menu, because there could be some issues with how reliably VLC may be able to do so / not be able to do so.

When we tell VLC to Play A Directory, I see no such check-box.

Dirk

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

3 thoughts on “A Word Of Warning about Using tsMuxer And Certain UDF Versions”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please Prove You Are Not A Robot *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>